So let’s talk about Instagram’s new logo, okay?

Instagram’s new rainbow sherbet vomit is currently causing a rift in the design community. Some people love it, while others absolutely abhor it. Personally, I kind of like it…kind of.instagram-old-new-logo_2

When Apple first launched iPhone, much of its interface followed skeuomorphic design principles. Skeuomorphic design pulls ornamental elements from real-life objects and brings them into the digital realm even though those elements are no longer necessary. For example, the top of Apple’s iCal App interface used to look like leather with stitching; the Notes App used to look like a real notepad with paper torn at the top; Apple’s Newsstand used to look like a miniature wooden book shelf…you get the idea.

skeuomorphic

The old Instagram logo was still stuck in this dated, literal representation of an object realm.

The new logo strips away all the unnecessary decorative elements and gives us the bare minimum of visual cues necessary for our brains to decipher that the logo is a representation of a camera. In my opinion, when it comes to app design, for the most part, cleaner and simpler equals better ease of usability.

Color doesn’t always equal tacky, and black doesn’t always equal elegant.

As for that rainbow gradient of colors in the background of the logo? The part of me that jumps for joy when seeing a rainbow—or even better, a double rainbow—loves it. I’ve never been one to shy away from color in anything in my life; from my wardrobe to design to my apartment decor.

Color doesn’t always equal tacky, and black doesn’t always equal elegant. Color, when used appropriately, can elevate a design to a whole new level, so don’t be afraid of it!

But another part of me worries that these colorful gradients are just a fleeting trend and five to 10 years from now, we’ll all be saying, “Oh, yeah, that was definitely made in 2016.”

Usually, good design doesn’t rely on short-lived trends. Logos like Coca-Cola, GE and IBM have stood the test of time because each were designed using unwavering core design principles and with longevity in mind. But then again, Instagram exists in a fleeting, temporary digital realm, so maybe they’re allowed to design something that won’t make it to the year 2116.

Overall, I’d say it’s an upgrade and a step in the right direction, but this new logo might be so simplified and trend-based that Instagram has given its new brand a very short shelf life.

So let’s talk about Instagram’s new logo, okay?

Instagram’s new rainbow sherbet vomit is currently causing a rift in the design community. Some people love it, while others absolutely abhor it. Personally, I kind of like it…kind of.instagram-old-new-logo_2

When Apple first launched iPhone, much of its interface followed skeuomorphic design principles. Skeuomorphic design pulls ornamental elements from real-life objects and brings them into the digital realm even though those elements are no longer necessary. For example, the top of Apple’s iCal App interface used to look like leather with stitching; the Notes App used to look like a real notepad with paper torn at the top; Apple’s Newsstand used to look like a miniature wooden book shelf…you get the idea.

skeuomorphic

The old Instagram logo was still stuck in this dated, literal representation of an object realm.

The new logo strips away all the unnecessary decorative elements and gives us the bare minimum of visual cues necessary for our brains to decipher that the logo is a representation of a camera. In my opinion, when it comes to app design, for the most part, cleaner and simpler equals better ease of usability.

Color doesn’t always equal tacky, and black doesn’t always equal elegant.

As for that rainbow gradient of colors in the background of the logo? The part of me that jumps for joy when seeing a rainbow—or even better, a double rainbow—loves it. I’ve never been one to shy away from color in anything in my life; from my wardrobe to design to my apartment decor.

Color doesn’t always equal tacky, and black doesn’t always equal elegant. Color, when used appropriately, can elevate a design to a whole new level, so don’t be afraid of it!

But another part of me worries that these colorful gradients are just a fleeting trend and five to 10 years from now, we’ll all be saying, “Oh, yeah, that was definitely made in 2016.”

Usually, good design doesn’t rely on short-lived trends. Logos like Coca-Cola, GE and IBM have stood the test of time because each were designed using unwavering core design principles and with longevity in mind. But then again, Instagram exists in a fleeting, temporary digital realm, so maybe they’re allowed to design something that won’t make it to the year 2116.

Overall, I’d say it’s an upgrade and a step in the right direction, but this new logo might be so simplified and trend-based that Instagram has given its new brand a very short shelf life.

ICONS ARE BETTER #82: THE VINYL RECORD

From the turn of the century we’ve had methods of recording and listening to music. Since then we’ve continuously evolved how we listen to it, making the music better, more accessible, portable, and sharable. Music is everywhere today. But with all that convenience we lost a bit of the magic that comes from the listening to it.
Music these days is everywhere. It follows you to work each morning, giving you space as you commute among crowds. It creates a cocoon as you sit in your desk and manage daily tasks in an open plan workspace. It’s your constant companion, always in your pocket ready to distract at a moment’s notice. But it is typically relegated to the background, it’s a barrier to your surroundings, and more often than not it’s passive, secondary to the task of driving, walking, working etc. The same is not so with Vinyl. Vinyl is

The Quest for More Creative Marketing

How can advertising produce more creative, more ambitious, and more daring work in the face of industry pressures and change? That was the topics of yesterday’s Guardian-hosted web chat, which Rob Meldrum, our Director of Experience Architecture, took part in alongside six other panelists. Covering everything from the challenges holding…

Project Two Fish

The music of former W+Ker Laura Lee’s band Khruangbin has been described as everything from “a spellbinding twist on surf rock and soul” (The New Yorker) to “hypnotic” and (The Guardian). Fellow W+K CD Scott — and Khruangbin fan — was so taken by the band’s song “Two Fish and…

Let’s Be Frank

Swing by our offices on Hanbury Street over the next two weeks and you can experience our newest window display: The World’s Largest Scratch ‘n’ Sniff.* It’s oversized, smells delightfully porky, and ranks highly on a scale of “Instagrammability.” Come see, come smell. *As of yet unverified by Guinness Book…

Co-Founder Roy Spence inducted into Advertising Hall of Fame

Reverend Roy. He’s known for co-founding GSD&M in 1971 with partners Judy Trabulsi, Steve Gurasich and Tim McClure, but he’s perhaps best known for his electric and passionate personality. So, it was with joy and pride, yet little surprise, when we learned our fearless leader would be the first Austinite and second Texan to be inducted into the American Advertising Federation’s 67th Annual Advertising Hall of Fame. His accomplishments include bringing on renowned brands like Southwest Airlines, Walmart, AT&T and Charles Schwab to the GSD&M roster, authoring three books, co-founding The Purpose Institute to help companies find their core purpose and values, and even starting his own hot sauce line, Royito’s. But it is Roy’s heart, as President Bill Clinton noted at the induction ceremony, that’s led him to success in advertising, leadership and all aspects of life. We couldn’t be more proud of you, Reverend Roy. Ride At Dawn!