Lauren Prociv on The Drum’s Inaugural 50 Under 30

Meet The Drum’s US 50 under 30 honorees from the South

By Minda Smiley | August 17, 2017

Each day this week, The Drum has been highlighting 10 of the 50 talented women that make up our inaugural 50 under 30 in the US, a list that is celebrating women across the country who are putting themselves – and their cities – on the map via their creativity, achievements and dedication to an industry that is changing at a fast clip.

Today we are featuring our honorees from the South. Each was chosen with the help of a judging panelthat included MullenLowe Los Angeles executive creative director Margaret Keene, Colle McVoy executive creative director Laura Fegley, Arnold Worldwide chief creative officer Icaro Doria and Barker EVP-creative director Sandi Harari.

After receiving nominations from readers, the judges helped choose the final 50, who will also be featured in the October issue of The Drum’s magazine.

Below, our finalists from the South discuss career achievements, advice they’d give to those just starting out in advertising and favorite things about living and working in their respective cities.

Lauren Prociv, senior strategic planner-UX at The Martin Agency in Richmond, Virginia

What is your biggest career achievement to date?

Learning how to play golf. I took up the game because I was tired of hearing the adage about how many deals and decisions are made out there and I didn’t want to miss out. Now I love it. It’s cheesy but the game is one giant metaphor for strategy, confidence and persistence in a world full of both sunny days and windy days and you have to be able to play through both.

What brand means the most to you?

Coca-Cola. When I was 13-years-old, I wrote and mailed (neither Facebook nor Twitter were invented yet..) them an angry letter over something hilariously trivial about their can art (long story). Two weeks later a giant package of swag arrived with a hand-signed letter thanking me for my passion. And there was two of everything because at the end of my letter I said something to the effect of, “P.S., my twin sister is mad at you too.”

What one piece of advice would you offer someone entering advertising today?

Creativity is a muscle. Too often I hear “I’m not creative enough for advertising.” Well, you couldn’t do 100 push-ups if you’ve never done push-ups before either, right? You can do both those things if you put in the work, stay focused and never settle.

Continue to The Drum.

Alibaba Sales Jump 56%, Boosted by Demand From Chinese Shoppers


Alibaba Group’s quarterly revenue rose 56% from the comparable year-earlier period, powered by Chinese consumers’ thirst for buying cheaper and higher-quality goods online.

Revenue at China’s biggest e-commerce company hit $7.4 billion in the three months ended June, the company said.

Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. has bolstered its dominance in e-commerce by improving the advertising algorithms it uses to generate revenue from brands trying to reach the 466 million active consumers on its online platforms. That is buying time for billionaire Chairman Jack Ma to venture into traditional retail, a sector he wants to revamp via experiments like HeMa Supermarket, a fresh foods store that also provides online grocery delivery.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

Trends In Content: 07 Originals Everywhere, Instagram Murals and Creepy IKEA

apple-tv

Image Credit: 9 to 5 Mac

CONTENT: Apple investing 1 Billion in their own content 

Every man and their dog are now making original content. You’ve been doing it for years with your hilarious Snaps and Instagram Stories. Someone should invest in you, but until that day comes round, companies continue to plough more money into inventing the next blockbuster. However, Apple’s financial investment is about a sixth of what Netflix is spending. If Apple can make more (read = better) shows they will be able to gain a higher revenue share per show for the Apple Store. They have a long way to go Apple’s Planet of the Apps has an IMDB score of 6.1/10 while Netflix’s House of Cards scores 9/10.

 

INFOGRAPHIC: How many of the world’s population uses social media?

 

SOCIAL MEDIA: In the Age of Instagram, Murals Take on New Meaning

The art wall’s allure as a social media-worthy photo op has been embraced by retailers as a marketing opportunity. Does it convert into sales?

 

CONTENT: Facebook takes on YouTube with Watch, its new episodic video service

More original programming?! The service is presently being tested with a handful of users in the US and will gradually roll out nationwide. Facebook is funding some shows and inviting independent creators to sign up to the platform on their own as well; once they’re in, they’ll get a Show Page (similar to Pages for brands) that fans can follow and find clips on.

 

WATCH IKEA ASMR

This is how you sell furniture. We applaud the long-form advert, it’s 25 minutes, weird and wonderful.

The Real Reason ISPs Hate Net Neutrality Regulation

It’s less about the question of a free internet and more about fears of being regulated as monopolies.

After years of speeches and protests, you probably have the gist of the arguments for net neutrality: Don’t mess with what I can read/watch/download/upload, either by blocking or slowing it down. But the current net neutrality fight is really a wide-ranging power struggle between internet service providers and internet activists, between Republicans and Democrats. The battle is only partly about the ends—a free internet—and much more about the means: potential heavy regulation of ISPs as monopolies.

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Five Times This Extremely Common Word Can Hold You Back At Work

First-person pronouns like “I,” “me,” and “my,” are unavoidable, but they can land you in hot water if you don’t know how to use them.

Try going a day at work without saying “I”–bet you can’t do it. The same likely goes for “me” and “my,” pronouns we use so frequently that we’re almost never fully conscious of them. But these tiny words, in addition to other common “function” words–like articles, prepositions, and conjunctions–may carry more weight in our speech than many of us suspect. And according to the social psychologist James W. Pennebaker, first-person pronouns in particular don’t always communicate what we think they do.

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The Economist’s Trump-KKK cover pulls no punches, and neither does the story

Bet someone’s not renewing their subscription to the Economist. The weekly magazine appears to have had quite enough of Donald Trump, thank you very much. It published a story today declaring the president to be “politically inept, morally barren, and temperamentally unfit for office.” He’s probably not invited to sit at their lunch table, either. The magazine’s bluntness … Continue reading “The Economist’s Trump-KKK cover pulls no punches, and neither does the story”

Bet someone’s not renewing their subscription to the Economist. The weekly magazine appears to have had quite enough of Donald Trump, thank you very much. It published a story today declaring the president to be “politically inept, morally barren, and temperamentally unfit for office.” He’s probably not invited to sit at their lunch table, either. The magazine’s bluntness is not unprecedented—after all, this is the publication that featured Kim Jong Il on the cover under the headline “Greetings earthlings“—but it’s especially blunt in this case. The cover features an illustration of Trump yelling into a bullhorn shaped like a KKK hood. It’s part of a pattern, though: Unflattering Trump-themed covers have been pretty common for the Economist since January.

Read Full Story

The Economist’s Trump-KKK cover pulls no punches, and neither does the story

Bet someone’s not renewing their subscription to the Economist. The weekly magazine appears to have had quite enough of Donald Trump, thank you very much. It published a story today declaring the president to be “politically inept, morally barren, and temperamentally unfit for office.” He’s probably not invited to sit at their lunch table, either. The magazine’s bluntness … Continue reading “The Economist’s Trump-KKK cover pulls no punches, and neither does the story”

Bet someone’s not renewing their subscription to the Economist. The weekly magazine appears to have had quite enough of Donald Trump, thank you very much. It published a story today declaring the president to be “politically inept, morally barren, and temperamentally unfit for office.” He’s probably not invited to sit at their lunch table, either. The magazine’s bluntness is not unprecedented—after all, this is the publication that featured Kim Jong Il on the cover under the headline “Greetings earthlings“—but it’s especially blunt in this case. The cover features an illustration of Trump yelling into a bullhorn shaped like a KKK hood. It’s part of a pattern, though: Unflattering Trump-themed covers have been pretty common for the Economist since January.

Read Full Story