Sticking it to the man; deleting social and not shopping on Amazon

If you thought the rise of veganism was bad, you’re about to be bombarded by a new wave of social consciousness that demands you delete your social media, especially Facebook, and stop shopping on Amazon in a bid to be more mindful to local businesses. Perhaps the hipsters searching for their gluten free loafs was just the beginning and we are indeed entering a new period of enlightenment, sparked by the recent revelations from Cambridge Analytica and Facebook. The carelessness of Zuckerberg with our personal data has led to trending hashtags and moral dilemmas everywhere as we debate leaving Facebook and joining platforms that are built on the notions of privacy.

Perhaps leaving social media and avoiding Amazon’s easy consumerism is the new way to stick it to the man as creating start-ups doesn’t seem to be doing the trick anymore, but how realistic is it and what does it mean for the world of advertising? Whether we like it or not, our social media presence allows us to be part of communities in a world where physical communities are dying out and as humans, we have a natural desire to belong to things. As much as you might sometimes want to leave the grind and retire to a cabin in the woods, it doesn’t really work like that and our desire for human companionship would start to kick in at some point. Not to mention the huge sharing of information that happens across social media and our ability to be part of conversations that are not always accessible to us in our physical lives. The question is less should you leave it, but rather is our world set up to give us what we need without it?

The advertising world certainly isn’t and if more people leave, will we revert back to billboards and posters advertising our wares? The reality is that social media or not, online has a place in most people’s lives and Facebook’s recent blunder means that a group of techies are probably sitting in a room somewhere, building the next social platform, all with the USP of absolute and total privacy, with the promise never to share data. As long as those platforms exist, companies will find a way to be part of them and therefore to advertise their products. The job of advertising is to be where the eyeballs are, and whether it’s online or in that cabin in the woods, they’ll find a way to be there too. The arguments therefore aren’t so much whether this will affect the ad world, but rather how will it change us because let’s be honest, advertising and marketing isn’t going bust any time soon.

And should a new wave of socially conscious consumers really herald in a new dawn where Amazon is shunned and Facebook deleted, surely then it will bring about a new of advertising and talking to consumers. It might make us all a little bit more innovative and a lot less dry. It might make things more exciting for us all, and maybe, just maybe, it might be the shake up some companies need.

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Rebranding with a Side of Burgers

Ever heard of IHOb?

If not, you will soon. Last Monday, social media went crazy when IHOP, the International House of Pancakes, announced IHOb as its new name on Twitter.

And what does the “b” stand for?

Burgers.

This sudden identity-swap for one of the most popular chain restaurants in the United States took Twitter by a storm. Seeing an opportunity, other food chains latched onto the trend by coming up with their own ideas to get in on the publicity stunt. Burger King temporarily became “Pancake King,” Netflix hinted at becoming “Netflib,” and Wendy’s took a crack at IHOb for trying out burgers because pancakes were “too hard” to make.

 

And yet, IHOb’s name change has sparked renewed interest across the general public, with the limelight placed on their recently-released Ultimate Steakburger menu. Their seven basic burgers have already been reviewed positively by several food critics and customers.

But why the need for a rebrand?

IHOP was known for doing well in the early morning and late night hours, a time when pancakes and other breakfast foods are most attractive. This did not apply to their midday sales, which had been dwindling over the past 10 quarters. A revamping of the lunch menu to attract customers into their stores for good, quality burgers seemed like the logical solution.

The results of this gimmicky rebrand appear to be positive. Since IHOb’s social media debut on June 5th, Dine Brands Global (DIN) stock rose by +5%. DIN owns IHOP and Applebee’s.

The question remains, however, if IHOb will see an increase in actual sales.

That’s up to the customers.

 

C-K wins T. Marzetti AOR assignment.

MediaPost – June 13, 2018

By Larissa Faw

T. Marzetti Company, the $1.2 billion specialty food company that spans 16 brands, is appointing Cramer-Krasselt (C-K) as its new AOR. The incumbent shop was MullenLowe Profero.

The selection came after a formal review in which half a dozen agencies participated.

C-K will handle advertising, media, programmatic, brand planning, digital, social media, and public relations for all product lines including Marzetti salad dressings, New York Bakery frozen breads and Sister Schubert’s rolls.

The first work under this new partnership will launch in the fall.

“At the core of T. Marzetti and each of their brands is a great story,” says Karen Seamen, president/COO, C-K. “The opportunity to further build these brands in consumer’s hearts and minds – and on their dinner tables — is huge.”

This search was launched by T. Marzetti’s private equity parent Lancaster Colony to “seek an integrated, idea-driven agency to unify its content, context strategies and executions in a way that helps the brands meet and connect with consumers on those consumers’ terms,” says an agency spokesperson.

In addition, the company plans to overcome declining retail packaged good sales through innovation, according to a June 7 presentation at the Baird’s 2018 Global Consumer, Technology & Services Conference by Lancaster Colony executive Dave Ciesinski. For instance, Sister Schubert’s rolls will soon introduce a cinnamon version and FlavorIt! flatbreads will introduce 60-calorie options. All of these new products, accordingly, will receive advertising support.

 

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Using Facebook Messenger chatbots for research

Research is a powerful tool. It’s often at the centre of any strategic marketing planning (or it should be!) and forms the backbone of many marketing campaigns.

For example, when designing our hero content for clients, we look at the data. What does the data tell us to do? We have plenty of content marketing tools that we can use to help us. But often, there’s one data set that we are crucially missing – first party.

Research from our client’s audience. What do they like? What do they think? What interests them?

Getting the answers to these questions can often be either quite costly or quite time-consuming (or both!) But luckily, using Facebook Messenger can cut down on both of these costs.

By using a chatbot, you largely automate the process and – depending on how you incentivise participation – it can be mostly cost-free.

Additionally, chatbots allow you to collate data on the fly, and not have to wait months for your research to be analysed and fed back to you.

Setting up your Messenger chatbots

Hopefully conducting research isn’t new to you – but if it is, make sure you read up on the basics of how to conduct good, reliable qualitative research first.

Once you’ve done that, you should be ready to start making your chatbot. But there are a couple of things you should keep in mind before you start.

You’ll need to drive participation

Let’s be honest, most people will only engage with your research if you offer them something. You can either go down the free stuff route, or you can give away coupons. Coupons tend to work better, as you are still driving sales and you also only appeal to people who would buy something from your site – i.e. actual customers.

However, the problem with this is that if you give away something too good, everyone will sign up to answer your questions and then your data becomes skewed. It’s a fine line to walk.

The easiest way to drive participation is through Facebook ads – shockingly. But these can really help you reach a lot of people quickly.

Make it chatty

It’s a chatbot, after all, so make your questions seem conversational! Make sure you say hello, and structure all of your questions to be chatty.

There is a danger, however, of overusing emojis and GIFs. These can skew your data, so try and make sure that your questions do not favour one response over the other.

Don’t forget to go granular

Bot analytics platforms like Chatbase and Botanalytics both allow you to go pretty granular with the responses you can get from your bots, and they integrate with Facebook Messenger very easily.

These tools allow you to simply see where people are confused or don’t understand the question, as well as where people are dropping off.

Fight fatigue at every step

If you do find that a lot of people are dropping off, you can easily restructure the question. Don’t forget to remind people how far in they are. Using a conversational tone – something like “You’re halfway now!” – can help combat fatigue in your participants.

Get GDPR compliant

GDPR is now upon us, so don’t forget to have people opt-in to having their data used. It is also a wise idea to have your bot present the privacy policy upfront, before the first question. That way, users know exactly what they’re getting into and you won’t get slapped with a huge fine.

Make it mobile friendly!

Most people will be accessing Facebook Messenger on their phones, so make sure your chatbot is mobile friendly. For multiple choice questions, buttons really are your friend and can help stop the fatigue of writing the same thing over and over.

Marketers are always going to have to find new ways to grab the attention of their audiences, and I think chatbots are a great way to drive interaction with the brand and conduct market research quickly and for minimal cost.

Related posts:

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Five Ways PR can Help your Cryptocurrency Shoot to the Moon

It’s safe to say that the cryptocurrency market is growing bigger every day. Blockchain-based startups and cryptocurrency creators are appearing all over the world, offering solutions to the world’s financial problems in the form of code and unique mining strategies. In fact, ICOs, or initial coin offerings funding for start-ups has officially exceeded traditional venture funding.

Companies in this field need even more help getting their voices heard. The good news is that effective public relations companies can help any  crypto companies make the most out of their marketing strategy.

They Develop a Reputation of Transparency

No matter what industry a company is in, credibility is a critical component in earning sales and customer loyalty. Today’s consumers want to know that they can trust the organization they’re working with – and this is particularly important for those located in the financial sector. The good news? Public Relations helps to create this appearance of transparency. They show consumers what makes a specific currency so valuable to their needs before asking for investment.

Create a Marketing Strategy

Don’t just announce the presence of a cryptocurrency on social media and hope for the best. Create a custom strategy based on that organization’s expectations and needs. In a world where cryptocurrencies keep growing, the businesses that want attention need to be willing to work for it.  The right campaigns mix influencer marketing, position papers – and of course, a great product.

Expert Insights

Start with extensive research into that company’s market – including the competitors that they’re working against. This expert research helps

establish a presence where their audience is – whether that’s YouTube, Twitter, or another location entirely.  Dont be behind the trends.

Establish Authority in the Field

In a world where almost, anyone can become a cryptocurrency entrepreneur, the organizations that get ahead will be the ones that show themselves as experts in their field. Today’s investors are looking to work with brands who understand the possibilities of the blockchain and the opportunities presented by crypto. Establish a thought leadership strategy that highlights their authority and turns them into a powerful resource online.

Maintain Constant Communication

Finally, in a space as fast-paced as the cryptocurrency market, consumers want to feel as though they’re always ahead of the curve. Public Relations programs agencies can implement a communication strategy to ensure that the community is always informed of what their client is doing next. This helps to create an air of transparency and reliability that investors appreciate.

5WPR is a leading cryptocurrency public relations firm.

The post Five Ways PR can Help your Cryptocurrency Shoot to the Moon appeared first on 5W PR News and Updates, NY Public Relations Agency Blog.

Porsche—time to get in.

Communication Arts  – June 7, 2018

Responses by Won You, vice president/experience design director, Cramer-Krasselt and Pavel Zagoskin, technical director, Wildlife.la

Background: The Porsche microsite seeks to inspire potential owners to purchase these cars by providing both practical and emotional “reasons to believe.” To do so, we ensured that shopping actions were displayed in a highly visual and engaging manner; each model in the lineup was featured on its own dedicated page. Video content of real people who had just taken ownership of their first Porsche sports cars was also showcased, further enticing users to take the next step.

Highlights: The site was created with a mobile-first strategy, so the team decided to craft a story that’s told through a clean, minimal design, while still featuring numerous 911 and 718 models. When developing the microsite, we used Porsche’s iconic design language. From header to footer, every model is introduced in silhouette form. And in model specific sections, environmental backgrounds are used to create a unique mood based on the driving dynamics of each car.

Challenges: Figuring out how to create a fast loading and sleek mobile-first experience across devices while still serving some heavy media content. Our development partner, Wildlife, addressed this challenge by utilizing a combination of intelligent route-based asset loading, CDN caching and compression. We also had a tight design timeframe. We had to complete our initial user experience and design exploration within three days.

Navigational structure: The website is principally organized by the 718 and 911 models. However, to encourage users to discover more content, we created multiple call-out modules that allow users to explore other model variants and first-time Porsche owner stories. On the desktop, we created a unique submenu that shows the lineup of the model variants. On mobile, we created an expanded menu in the footer to allow users to navigate without clicking on the hamburger menu.

Technical features: Subtle movement and ambient animations created life and a sense of depth, and the smooth transitions between each different model consist of one module that utilizes cleverly animated masks. In addition, we used HTML5, CSS3, JS, React.js, TweenMax and jQuery for the site; there is no backend other than the CloudFront CDN servers hosting the site. To encourage users to build their own Porsche, we also created a carousel that is consistently docked on the bottom of each of the model pages.

timetogetin.com 

The post Porsche—time to get in. appeared first on Cramer-Krasselt.

Porsche—time to get in.

Communication Arts  – June 7, 2018

Responses by Won You, vice president/experience design director, Cramer-Krasselt and Pavel Zagoskin, technical director, Wildlife.la

Background: The Porsche microsite seeks to inspire potential owners to purchase these cars by providing both practical and emotional “reasons to believe.” To do so, we ensured that shopping actions were displayed in a highly visual and engaging manner; each model in the lineup was featured on its own dedicated page. Video content of real people who had just taken ownership of their first Porsche sports cars was also showcased, further enticing users to take the next step.

Highlights: The site was created with a mobile-first strategy, so the team decided to craft a story that’s told through a clean, minimal design, while still featuring numerous 911 and 718 models. When developing the microsite, we used Porsche’s iconic design language. From header to footer, every model is introduced in silhouette form. And in model specific sections, environmental backgrounds are used to create a unique mood based on the driving dynamics of each car.

Challenges: Figuring out how to create a fast loading and sleek mobile-first experience across devices while still serving some heavy media content. Our development partner, Wildlife, addressed this challenge by utilizing a combination of intelligent route-based asset loading, CDN caching and compression. We also had a tight design timeframe. We had to complete our initial user experience and design exploration within three days.

Navigational structure: The website is principally organized by the 718 and 911 models. However, to encourage users to discover more content, we created multiple call-out modules that allow users to explore other model variants and first-time Porsche owner stories. On the desktop, we created a unique submenu that shows the lineup of the model variants. On mobile, we created an expanded menu in the footer to allow users to navigate without clicking on the hamburger menu.

Technical features: Subtle movement and ambient animations created life and a sense of depth, and the smooth transitions between each different model consist of one module that utilizes cleverly animated masks. In addition, we used HTML5, CSS3, JS, React.js, TweenMax and jQuery for the site; there is no backend other than the CloudFront CDN servers hosting the site. To encourage users to build their own Porsche, we also created a carousel that is consistently docked on the bottom of each of the model pages.

timetogetin.com 

The post Porsche—time to get in. appeared first on Cramer-Krasselt.

Porsche—time to get in.

Communication Arts  – June 7, 2018

Responses by Won You, vice president/experience design director, Cramer-Krasselt and Pavel Zagoskin, technical director, Wildlife.la

Background: The Porsche microsite seeks to inspire potential owners to purchase these cars by providing both practical and emotional “reasons to believe.” To do so, we ensured that shopping actions were displayed in a highly visual and engaging manner; each model in the lineup was featured on its own dedicated page. Video content of real people who had just taken ownership of their first Porsche sports cars was also showcased, further enticing users to take the next step.

Highlights: The site was created with a mobile-first strategy, so the team decided to craft a story that’s told through a clean, minimal design, while still featuring numerous 911 and 718 models. When developing the microsite, we used Porsche’s iconic design language. From header to footer, every model is introduced in silhouette form. And in model specific sections, environmental backgrounds are used to create a unique mood based on the driving dynamics of each car.

Challenges: Figuring out how to create a fast loading and sleek mobile-first experience across devices while still serving some heavy media content. Our development partner, Wildlife, addressed this challenge by utilizing a combination of intelligent route-based asset loading, CDN caching and compression. We also had a tight design timeframe. We had to complete our initial user experience and design exploration within three days.

Navigational structure: The website is principally organized by the 718 and 911 models. However, to encourage users to discover more content, we created multiple call-out modules that allow users to explore other model variants and first-time Porsche owner stories. On the desktop, we created a unique submenu that shows the lineup of the model variants. On mobile, we created an expanded menu in the footer to allow users to navigate without clicking on the hamburger menu.

Technical features: Subtle movement and ambient animations created life and a sense of depth, and the smooth transitions between each different model consist of one module that utilizes cleverly animated masks. In addition, we used HTML5, CSS3, JS, React.js, TweenMax and jQuery for the site; there is no backend other than the CloudFront CDN servers hosting the site. To encourage users to build their own Porsche, we also created a carousel that is consistently docked on the bottom of each of the model pages.

timetogetin.com 

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Data, privacy, and us; the fight for information

If we ever thought knowledge was power, we were clearly misinformed. It’s not the knowledge of the cosmos or the history of Troy that’s powerful, but rather, the collection of personal data that has become the new trading currency in our modern world. Marketers, businesses, and even the casual salesperson on the street are all engaged in a battle of data to gain as much personal information as they possibly can to hit targets, KPIs or revenue quotas. We collect and horde data like it’s the last tin of beans in a post-apocalyptic world, and as we sit in the wake of the GDPR legislation, perhaps this is the post-apocalyptic landscape that marketing is experiencing.

For the last year there’s been a constant flow of articles, survival guides if you will, on exactly what GDPR is, what it includes and what you can do to get around it, but perhaps we’ve been asking the wrong question all along. Instead of looking for loopholes and evading legislative change, shouldn’t we be fighting to put greater power into the hands of consumers, instead of trying to praise it from their grasp with the assumption that we know best? Of course, the counter argument to that is that sometimes marketers do know best, because if we consider mental availability and a connected shopper journey, then surely some consumers don’t know what they want until we place it in their inbox or use their IP address to flash it across their screens. We’ve worked in retail long enough to know that the giants of this industry aren’t particularly keen on handing that much power back to the consumer, essentially because it will make their lives invariably harder. It will also serve as the call to step up to so many and let us just entertain the idea for a moment that perhaps the latest data protection laws could be the renaissance for the marketing and advertising world.

We spend so much time complaining about lazy marketing and uninspiring advertising campaigns, and with so much access to the consumer, because of the masses of data that sits in the palm of our hands, there isn’t really a need for too much creativity or genius. When you already have their eye, because you have their email address and consent, you’re not really stretching your creative capacity to catch that eye, and so the result can be below par content.

Let us, for a moment, look on the bright side of life and assume that even when buyers don’t give their consent, and ask to be opted out of the mailing lists and the campaigns, and they don’t even want to see your name flash across their screen, perhaps it will push us all to become a flurry of innovation and creativity. Perhaps we’ll discover new avenues of invention and find more exciting ways to build relationships with consumers and catch their eyes. Perhaps we’ll become daring and brave in our campaigns and maybe, just maybe, it might bring out some of our best work yet. Perhaps it is just another creative period, and if some of the best painters and artists came out of the last renaissance, surely, we’ll begin to see the best ad agencies emerge and maybe it will take us all into our very own age of enlightenment.

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