Brand Safety – The New Reality

The Shifting Landscape of Digital Brand Safety

It’s a marketer’s worst nightmare: Learning your brand’s digital ads have been seen alongside terrorist recruitment videos and content created by hate groups. That’s exactly what happened to many advertisers in March of 2017 as word spread that ads on Google-owned video platform YouTube were shown with violent and graphic content. The resulting controversy, advertiser boycott, and ongoing industry debate brought the hot-water topic of brand safety – a brand’s requirement for ads to appear in or next to relevant, appropriate content – to a boil.

The association between ads and the content they’re seen with has been a concern among brands for years, but never has it been so keenly felt as in the age of widespread digital and social advertising. As more brand safety headlines have appeared and consumers have spoken out on social media, the ad industry has been shaken to the highest levels. In fact, according to a September 2017 study conducted by the CMO Council, 67 percent of marketers stated that poor “adjacency” (negative context from content surrounding digital ads) had damaged perceptions of their brand qualities and values.

 

So How Did We Get Here?

Digital advertising has been around for close to two decades now, so brand safety itself is not a new issue. What is new are landmark events and shifts in the brand safety landscape. These key things are contributing to brand safety’s importance in the advertising conversation of the last few years:

  • Quantity over quality in ad buying. The increasing demand for digital ad inventory (across social media as well as digital video and display) has been met with programmatic methods of buying and placing digital ads automatically, allowing efficient reach at an unprecedented scale. This created a growing appetite among advertisers for cheaper and cheaper reach, met by ad networks selling that cheap reach on a widening universe of ad placements. As the available ad inventory stretches further and faster, ads are placed on fringe sites espousing hate speech or on open-content sites like YouTube next to videos showing terrorism, violence, nudity, and more. This has also given rise to myriad issues linked to brand safety, including ad fraud, viewability, and media buying transparency. As the ad industry seeks high volumes of impressions for cheap, it loses a lot of the value of premium ad placements and high-quality experiences for consumers.
  • Brand safety errors from the world’s biggest ad platforms. Google and Facebook together control an enormous majority of the digital ad inventory in the U.S. (over 60 percent across both companies, according to eMarketer) and in the last year, they’ve given brands reason to worry. From Facebook’s multiple issues with fake news to Google’s brand safety controversies, marketers are realizing that the leading ad platforms have been too lax in the areas of fraud, transparency, and brand safety. In 2017, an increasing number of voices joined the chorus demanding more from Google, Facebook, and other ad networks in these areas.
  • An increasingly volatile cultural landscape. Since the 2016 presidential election, the U.S. has been divided over many issues, with controversies centered on race, patriotism, immigration, and more fueled largely by social media conversation. These flames have been fanned further by the rise of fake news – false headlines and hoaxes that spread rapidly on Facebook and Twitter. As a result, even marketers who attempt to stay neutral on most issues are not immune to brand-safety crises, as it’s easier than ever for an innocuous ad to appear next to a terror recruitment video, hate-speech-filled fake news article, or even content portraying a strong (and potentially controversial) political opinion. The increase in division over more issues in our country than ever before means there’s exponentially more harmful territory for ad placements than ever before.

 

The Brand Safety Landscape Is Changing

Even as the brand safety issue comes sharply into focus for marketers, it is continually changing, with new developments on a weekly (even daily) basis. What’s driving this change?

  • Social media as a (still) growing advertising destination…As social media networks like Facebook/Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, Pinterest, and Twitter continue to grow and compete with each other for advertising dollars, the volume, locations, and possible formats for ads grow as well. Undeniably, Facebook is leading this process as it expands its video capabilities (introducing mid-roll ads), continues news feed advertising (allowing brands to be in-feed with potentially damaging content), and expands ads across thousands of sites using Facebook Audience Network (which has contributed to additional brand safety issues). As video content increasingly becomes the norm for consumers’ social media experience, it opens opportunities for ads that may or may not be running during or near inappropriate content.
  • …and a consumer watchdog platform. Consumers have been utilizing social media’s two-way communication to give real-time feedback to brands for years, but recently social media has become more popular as a way to demand brand response for brand safety violations. In December 2016, online advertisers came under fire for advertising on controversial conservative news site Breitbart, and the consumer backlash toward those advertisers was manifested on Twitter, where a new account called “Sleeping Giants” was created with the purpose of drawing the spotlight (and groups of angry Twitter users) toward advertisers whose programmatic ad buys had placed ads on the site. As consumers – who often assume brands are supporting controversial material – grow more accustomed to Twitter and Facebook as platforms to unite in voicing protest, brands must respond quickly and effectively.
  • More platform tools for verification and transparency are on their way (but they won’t solve everything). As mentioned, large ad networks, specifically Google and Facebook, own a huge portion of the world’s advertising inventory. In 2017, they both came under fire for issues related to brand safety and transparency. Google has stated it will be working diligently to improve brand safety measures, and Facebook recently made similar claims. Mounting pressure from marketers in 2017 will manifest as useful standards, brand safety tools, and more transparent reporting from Google and Facebook in 2018. Be on the lookout for announcements about brand safety standards from both companies, and make sure your own brand safety standards align. Both companies will likely release tools that bring standardization and a smoother workflow to the process of checking brand safety across ad placements. And both Google and Facebook will continually face demand for crystal-clear reporting as marketers continue to invest heavily in advertising across both platforms. However, these measures will be more reactive than proactive, and are only a supplement to a forward-thinking approach to keeping your brand safe.

 

Infographic showing the growing pace of brand-safety crises timeline

 

How Can You Stay Brand-Safe?
  1. Identify current risks. Consider this an opportunity to review your current level of brand safety. Contact your advertising partners and request lists of the sites and social content you’re currently running ads against. It may take a lot of work and involve a short-term decrease in efficiency, but if it helps you avoid negative headlines like the dozens of brands mentioned in 2017 alone, it’s worth it. If your ad partners can’t provide a database, ask why. Seek new solutions.
  2. Don’t ignore the human element. Programmatic ad buying, tools, algorithms, and lists are useful and efficient, but no automated solution will ever fully replace human judgment and intuition. We (humans) understand context, we understand our audience, we understand the cultural climate in which we live. While there is no blanket solution for including human discernment in the process of buying digital and social advertising, it’s still crucially important for your brand. Whether it’s a human check of your list of sites on which you advertise, a recurring check-in with your agency or ad network, or some other method, take steps to insert a human element into your digital ad-buying process.
  3. Recognize the importance of social media. Social media are now more widely known as tools for direct feedback from consumers to brands, and in a politically chaotic, divisive era, brands who run into safety issues by running ads against divisive content (on one side or the other) will hear about it quickly. Be ready to use social media as the two-way communication tools they were meant to be. Develop a brand safety playbook so that the steps and lines of communications are already established. Communicate proactively, and pair social media communication with decisive action. Consumers asking for information and action on social media won’t patiently wait 48 or 72 hours for your brand to respond.
  4. Tailor your media plan to your brand’s principles. The landscape of brand safety has changed – not only are there dangers in being paired with violent or sexual content, but the increasingly turbulent and divisive political environment means that even appearing with political or cause-related content could spark a Twitter-fueled brand safety crisis. It is increasingly harder for a brand to truly stay “neutral” on issues, so if you haven’t already, now is the time to decide what your brand stands for – its principles – and reflect that in the sites and content you include in your digital media plan. Opt in to the sites that align with your principles; opt out of the ones that don’t. This is not an easy or quick process, but it’s becoming more important every day. Taking these steps will anchor you in the midst of a rapidly shifting brand safety landscape.

The post Brand Safety – The New Reality appeared first on The Richards Group.

Seeing the World Through Social Vision

Understanding What the Smartphone Camera Sees

Photos and videos are a huge part of our cultural conversation. 2.8 trillion photos were shared on social networks in 2017 (set to increase 15 percent each year). What happens when computers can suddenly see and understand that visual conversation at scale? And what can brands do with this newfound power? No need to wait. 2018 will be the year of social vision, with artificial intelligence (AI) transforming the smartphone camera into a tool that brands can use to learn about, communicate with, assist, and ultimately sell to consumers in new ways.

 

Vision, Part of the Bigger Picture

Vision is just one of four pillars in which we see AI transforming marketing. But it is perhaps the most exciting for brands and advertisers, because it promises to change how we learn about and talk to our consumers in such a fundamental way.

AI in marketing table

 

Say It With the Camera, We’ll Listen

Shared social photos are the cornerstone of conversation today. Snapchat sprung into adoption because people wanted to snap their messages rather than simply type them. And now Facebook, one of the 10 largest companies (by market capitalization) in the world, is telling its users to “let your camera do the talking.”

Facebook Camera effects let your camera do the talking

The question is, can we listen to this conversation? Over 3 billion social photos are shared daily. Of the photos that include a brand, 85 percent do not have a caption that references the brand. But with advances in computer vision, many social listening tools are gaining the capability of visual listening. By applying AI to the firehose of public social photography, companies like Ditto Labs use visual listening to help brands understand their place (or the place of their competitors) in consumers’ lives in a way that text conversation cannot.

This conversation provides context for consumption. Where are people most likely to be enjoying my product, with whom, when? It also provides information about competitive products so you can also target based on those interactions.

Photo Firehose
Source: Ditto Labs

Visual listening is only the beginning. New ad products are also making it possible to use social vision AI to target consumers. For instance, Cluep Pics allows advertisers to serve ads to audiences who have posted photos that feature specific competitors or environments.

Cluep ad serving
Image courtesy of Cluep

 

The Rise of the Lens

Google, Facebook, Snapchat, and Pinterest are all working to turn the smartphone camera from a simple tool for capturing photos into a lens through which people can discover their world. Enabled by image recognition, these companies want to change how you see and search, what you share, and what you can do anytime you are using a smart device.

Change How You See and Search

Today, you might search for knowledge about companies, products, and people by typing or talking to Google. In 2018, searching will be done with lens and images. And it’s no surprise that Google is at the forefront of this shift. With the release of Google Lens in September 2017, people can identify anything from famous artwork to buildings (including storefronts), look up product information, and save dates from posters to your calendar.

Google Lens tweet

Google CEO Sundar Pichai nodded at the ambition behind Google Lens when he said, “all of Google was built on first understanding text and web pages.” What he doesn’t mention is that much of the wealth of Google came from using its search engine to help brands advertise themselves with messages and relevant content. If tomorrow’s search engine is a lens, it follows that a lens is where tomorrow’s search advertising will live. In 2018, brands should be ready to take advantage of search ads beyond the search bar of a computer.

Using these ads, brands have the opportunity to begin to interact with consumers as they search and experience the real world.

For a preview of where Google may be headed, it is helpful to look at Alibaba, the second-largest Internet company in the world after Google. Alibaba is integrating computer vision into each step of the journey from search to purchase. For example, a customer who lenses a picture of a music album in the real world will be presented with the option of visiting the social profiles of the musicians, seeing more details about the event, or buying tickets. If they want to purchase tickets, they can then confirm payment just by smiling at the app.

Alibaba’s Alipay App
Alibaba’s Alipay App – Source: Alibaba

Change How You Share

Because the smartphone camera is inherently a social camera, lenses built on social networks are worth paying attention to. Snapchat, perhaps the first social lens, recently rebranded itself as a “camera company” and filed a patent on object recognition ads (e.g., detecting a cup of coffee in a shared photo would display a miniature Dunkin’ Donuts shop on the breakfast table).

Not to be outdone, Facebook recently released a suite of social lensing products. As Mark Zuckerberg introduced these new products at the 2017 F8 Conference, he stated that Facebook wants to “turn smartphone cameras into the first AR platform.”

Camera Effects Platform and AR Studio

In his demo of these products (Camera Effects Platform and AR Studio), Zuckerberg shows the Facebook Camera app detecting a bottle of wine and adding an information card, making object recognition ads (like those in Snapchat’s patent) seem not only inevitable but imminent. Through lenses, augmented reality (AR) can change what people see. But because the smartphone camera is inherently social, these experiences also change what people can “say” by sharing what they see.

Facebook Camera example

Though a runner may not be wearing any Nike clothing, the brand uses Facebook Camera to become part of how they share their run with friends. Source: Facebook

Brands should explore opportunities with AR products and social lenses that change what people see about their brand. Advertisers must hold these experiences to a high standard, perhaps even more so than other ads, as the social lens – which uses our most personal device to change how we see ourselves and our world – is an intimate one. Thus, ads that use the social lens must be useful, interesting, or worth sharing.

For more on how AR is becoming a powerful marketing force, read Utility Over Novelty: AR’s New Marketing Focus.

Change What You Do

Since the dawn of the Internet, people have been finding products on shelves and showroom floors, then searching for them online in hopes of finding a better price. With social vision, the barrier between physical products and the buy button is eroding.

Source: Pinterest

In February 2017, Pinterest released Pinterest Lens, a camera function that finds pins related to anything a user can point their camera at. Already, Pinterest recognizes pictures of branded goods, logos, and locations. But discovery is only half the story for Pinterest Lens. A growing number of pins on the Pinterest platform feature the “Buy Now” button, letting inspiration turn into transaction in the span of a moment. In September of this year, Target announced that it will be integrating Pinterest Lens into its app and website.

This is not limited to packaged products. Social vision will give us new ways to instantly act when we see nearly anything. Soon, the information card that pops up when you point your camera at a restaurant may include a “Reserve Now” button.

This expression of intent may even take the form of a screenshot. For example, rewardStyle’s new LIKEtoKNOW.it app harnesses image recognition technology to convert screenshots into an itemized list to be shopped. If the image in the screenshot is created by an “influencer” in rewardStyle’s network, the users will automatically receive an email with shoppable links to each of the featured products.

rewardStyle’s new LIKEtoKNOW.it app

Image courtesy of rewardStyle

 

Your Ads, Through a New Set of Eyes

Ultimately, the rise of social vision and lensing makes all ads and products Internet-connected, interactive, and inevitably social. Tomorrow, people will be looking at anything from a magazine to a billboard with a new set of digital eyes. Companies need to ensure their products and ads are recognizable and are designed with the next steps that computer vision apps make possible in mind. Here are some tips to ensure that your brand is seen in this new world:

Listen
Use visual listening tools to understand how your brand and your competitors fit into the culture and lives of your consumers.

Target
Consider using visual targeting ads based on what consumers have shared in their images.

Be Easy to Find
Make your storefronts recognizable and ensure your location data is current and accessible. Make sure product and logo images are widely available and easily identified by image recognition software.

Be Interactive
Create content that is tied to a greater experience. Encourage the use of social lenses to link experiences and ads to products for purchase (e.g., “snap this ad using Pinterest Lens to see the whole collection”). Look for ways to use augmented reality ads to showcase your product in a new light when different objects, people, or places are recognized.

Overall, social vision is a big milestone on our pathway to “reconciling our dual citizenship in the physical and digital worlds” (as Hiroshi Ishii of MIT’s Media Lab put it). It will radically change life and marketing in 2018 and beyond, rewarding brands who take advantage of visual listening, new ad types, and the social lens.

The post Seeing the World Through Social Vision appeared first on The Richards Group.

Porsche surprised coffee drinkers at a cafe with something to really wake them up.

Adweek – November 20, 2017

By David Gianatasio

Recently, a coffee shop in Carson, Calif., began offering customers a mysterious new beverage called E-Jolt, telling them it was so “incredibly powerful,” they’d have to sign a waiver before ordering.

“Waivers for coffee is the hip new thing,” explains a bearded hipster barista in the clip below.

Folks who put pen to paper were whisked outside to sample the product, and they were in for a wild ride. Their hearts raced and they sped around in circles, though this particular hidden-camera stunt wasn’t really selling coffee at all.

Who needs java to rev you up when you’ve got the 680-horsepower Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid, which goes from 0 to 60 in 3.2 seconds? It leaves those Starbucks holiday cups in the dust!

Rides took place at the Porsche Experience Center, about two miles from the coffee shop, and the whole scenario was designed to “shake up perceptions of hybrid technology,” Marshall Ross, creative chief at Cramer-Krasselt, the agency behind the stunt, tells AdFreak.

“Hybrid engines are considered ‘good’ technology thanks to their ecological benefits,” Ross says, “but they’re not known for much else. No one thinks hybrids are fun or exhilarating. And those two notions are central to the Porsche brand. The way this car adds a mind-blowing element to what is normally a fairly dull driver experience made us think about what a jolt of caffeine does. It creates a buzz, opens your eyes, wakes you up.”

The cafe channels the vibe of old commercials set in fancy restaurants, where brands such as Folgers would secretly replace fresh-brewed coffee with instant. Here, Porsche adds a high-octane twist: “We’ve secretly replaced their coffee with a car,” Ross says.

C-K and Porsche have teamed up for inventive work before, including magazine ads featuring holograms and other novel technology. “Innovation is a core brand attribute we want to amplify in communications,” Ross says. “So, we’re always looking for ways to behave innovatively, rather than simply talk about innovations.”

For E-Jolt, the challenge was “to create a situation that would give people a smile because how we demonstrated the car felt fresh and surprising,” he says. “While the hologram may look more ‘techy,’ this was pretty technical from a camera point of view. This was true hidden-camera. The responses were real. There were a ton of cameras to hide to make this work.”

That realism factor actually made C-K “a little nervous” going into the two-day shoot, Ross says, because “the entire success of this project hinged on people taking the plunge,” and the team worried that the adrenalized sales pitch and waiver might dissuade too many folks from ordering. “But nearly everyone did [order an E-Jolt]. The only ones that didn’t either weren’t feeling well, or were creatures of habit.”

In fact, one guy “opted for a baby quiche instead of a ride in a 680-horsepower sports car,” Ross says. “Hope the quiche was good.”

The post Porsche surprised coffee drinkers at a cafe with something to really wake them up. appeared first on Cramer krasselt.

Get a real buzz from launching great creative work? 

Us too!

 

It’s why Magnafi are looking for a marketing literate, results driven Director of Client Advocacy to help our clients realise their business and brand ambitions. Someone who shares our passion for exploring the evolution of film; challenging its conventions and continually searching out what’s next.

 

We imagine you as a natural leader who colleagues respect and love to go the extra mile for. You’ll create, retain and grow relationships with ease. You’ll be genuinely motivated by your client’s commercial success but know that continually championing the best creative ideas is their strongest ally. You’ll be strategically strong, quickly grasping your client’s business challenges and helping them translate them into meaningful goals and KPI’s. You’re also an incredible energizer for their team, turning empathy into actionable tasks at lightning speed.  You’ll thrive in a fast paced and demanding environment, demonstrating meticulous financial and organisational rigour. We think you’ll have experience leading multichannel film campaigns both client and agency side. Above all you’ll love film and the power it has to move audiences.

 

Magnafi is part of the MMI Group; the largest portfolio of content strategy and film production companies in Northern England (UK). We combine a full strategic agency set up with the largest TV commercial and content production engine outside London incorporating a studio complex & post-production facilities. You’ll work side by side with film directors, technologists, producers, designers, documentary makers, creatives, digital planners, motion graphics artists to name just a few.  It’s an unusual collection of skills all under one roof but it’s a set-up which our clients absolutely love.

 

And to continue to lead in this space, we recruit on a strong set of values born from a collective pride, ambition and inventiveness. Our shared ethos means we can run through walls together. The first question is always – are you with us?

 

If this hits you in the heart as well as the head then send us your cv or up to date Linkedin profile to hello@magnafi.com

 

We encourage applications from those seeking return to work, part time or flexible working arrangements and candidates from diverse backgrounds. International applications are welcome with relocation packages available.

 

The post Get a real buzz from launching great creative work?  appeared first on Magnafi.

Want to cast and direct the stars of our future?

It’s a big responsibility.

 

It’s why MMI Group are looking for an exceptional HR and Organisational Design Lead. Someone who shares our passion for exploring the evolution of film; challenging its conventions and continually searching out what’s next.

 

We imagine you’ll have enviable organisational skills twinned with an openness and authority that even the trickiest personality types warm to and respect. Working alongside a team of people frequently working on high stress projects, you’ll have brilliant emotional intelligence and be able to spot a burgeoning problem before it even registers with most. You’ll have the very latest thinking on team and individual performance at your fingertips. Continually looking to improve your knowledge and skills, you’ll be an avid reader of new studies but, having a critical mind, be able to select the right insights to best evolve our strategies and procedures. You’ll get a real buzz from helping the management team operationalise our values and set and meet HR Goals, KPIs and targets. You’ll be able to clearly articulate the business rational to all stakeholders and keep their focus on them even during more challenging commercial periods. We’re unapologetically bold in everything we do and have set ourselves the initial target of being employer of choice in the Northwest by 2020.

 

The MMI Group is the largest portfolio of content strategy and film production companies in Northern England (UK). Under our three brands (Magnafi, The Gate Films & Foundry Film Studios), we combine a full strategic agency set up with the largest TV commercial and content production engine outside London incorporating a studio complex & post-production facilities. You’ll work side by side with film directors, technologists, producers, designers, documentary makers, creatives, digital planners, motion graphics artists to name just a few.  It’s an unusual collection of skills all under one roof but it’s a set-up which our growing number of clients absolutely love.

 

And to continue to lead in this space, we recruit on a strong set of values born from a collective pride, ambition and inventiveness. Our shared ethos means we can run through walls together. The first question you’ve got to ask yourself is – are you with us?

 

If this hits you in the heart as well as the head then send us your cv or up to date Linkedin profile to hello@magnafi.com

 

We encourage applications from those seeking return to work, part time or flexible working arrangements and candidates from diverse backgrounds. International applications are welcome with relocation packages available.

 

The post Want to cast and direct the stars of our future? appeared first on Magnafi.

Conversation LAB celebrates new The Foschini Group account win

Conversation LAB Cape Town has won the fashion retailer EXACT, following its recent wins of Markham and Fabiani – also part of The Foschini Group (TFG) stable.

EXACT has appointed Conversation LAB as the digital agency to drive its digital and social presence. All work will be run out of Conversation LAB Cape Town office.

Nikki Crous, EXACT head of marketing, says, “We have ambitious plans in digital to ensure we deliver a unique brand experience for EXACT that drives brand awareness and sales. Conversation LAB demonstrated a real understanding of the scale of the task, as well as an in-depth insight into our target audience and the retail landscape that we operate in. We look forward to our partnership.”

Conversation LAB will manage a range of digital activity including website optimisation for the launch of the new e-commerce website and management and development of all content across social media platforms.

Kevin Power, MD of Conversation LAB, adds, “We strive to remain a highly agile and responsive agency, and working with top retail brands like EXACT and TFG ensures we do not lose that focus. EXACT affords us a huge opportunity to do some hard-hitting digital work that works in this tough trading environment. We are immensely proud to be afforded another key brand in the TFG stable.”

For more information, contact edward.spearman@conversationlab.com.

 

Source: https://www.mediaupdate.co.za/marketing/143006/conversation-lab-celebrates-new-the-foschini-group-account-win

 

The post Conversation LAB celebrates new The Foschini Group account win appeared first on Conversation LAB.

Conversation LAB wins aQuellé

aQuellé has appointed Conversation LAB as its digital agency of record to manage the full brand portfolio, including natural spring waters and flavored drinks. The scope of work covers all social media activity, full content and campaign development, bought digital media planning and buying.

Conversation LAB will also be tasked with creating digital excitement for aQuellé’s sponsorships, which include the aQuellé Midmar mile, aQuellé Ocean Racing Series, and aQuellé Tour Durban.

“We have known Kevin and the Conversation LAB team for many years now, and have always liked their approach to business and their passion for what they do — a passion very like ours,” says Arno Stegen, managing director of aQuellé. “They certainly appear to be at the forefront of the digital communications game, always innovating and adapting to the changing landscape. It is what we were looking for in a partner for such a crucial channel as digital and our sponsorship space!”

 

Source: http://www.marklives.com/radar/conversation-lab-wins-aquelle/

 

The post Conversation LAB wins aQuellé appeared first on Conversation LAB.

Do you believe the future of marketing is film & video?

Us too!

 

It’s why MMI Group are looking for a Marketing Manager to help us move through to the next stage of our expansion. Someone who shares our passion for exploring the evolution of film; challenging its conventions and continually searching out what’s next.

 

We imagine you’re a mix of data junkie and creative champion. You’ll love to immerse yourself in the brand and revel in working with our creatives and strategists to ensure our ideology comes across in every piece of communication. You’ll always have the latest competitor analysis to hand to ensure we remain distinctive and future facing. You’ll have a meticulous approach to defining our customer segments and be able to map customer journeys to create powerful campaign plans. You’ll have a perfect understanding of how to break down business objectives into a full array of goals, KPIs and targets plus a strong method for attribution modelling to highlight true success. You’ll have a real strength in content marketing and SEO, but be equally at home running PPC campaigns, email and events. You’ll have the organisational rigour to manage regular structural changes to our websites. You’ll push for the film we create for ourselves to be nominated for as many awards as our clients’ campaigns.

 

MMI Group is the largest portfolio of content strategy and film production companies in Northern England (UK). Under our three brands, we combine a full strategic agency set up with the largest TV commercial and content production engine outside London incorporating a studio complex & post-production facilities. You’ll work side by side with film directors, technologists, producers, designers, documentary makers, creatives, digital planners, motion graphics artists to name just a few. It’s an unusual collection of skills all under one roof but it’s a set-up which our clients absolutely love.

 

And to continue to lead in this space, we recruit on a strong set of values born from a collective pride, ambition and inventiveness. Our shared ethos means we can run through walls together. Consequently, we don’t mind if your industry experience is ten years or one. The first question is always – are you with us?

 

If this hits you in the heart as well as the head then send us your cv or up to date Linkedin profile to hello@magnafi.com

 

We encourage applications from those seeking return to work, part time or flexible working arrangements and candidates from diverse backgrounds. International applications are welcome with relocation packages available.

 

 

 

The post Do you believe the future of marketing is film & video? appeared first on Magnafi.

Are Facebook’s garden walls finally being knocked down?

Anybody who’s come into contact with Facebook Ads Manager knows that accessing any useful insights into your campaigns is like drawing blood from a stone. As such, we could only dream of them giving us access to a competitor insight tool – think the business version of trying to stalk your blind date after Facebook upped their privacy settings in 2014. Paid Search has Adthena, SEO Linkdex – so why doesn’t Facebook have one? All that could be about to change with the introduction of a new feature that will essentially allow businesses to ‘spy’ on competitors ads.

One minute you’re not able to even pull a report split by your chosen targeting segments, the next they give you the means to see every single active ad your competitor is running, – along with how much they’re spending and who they’re targeting – with one single click. So what prompted this giant step? It all stems from that time it came out that a Russian political group had been pushing political messages in ads during the US presidential election. The ads were seen by approximately 10 million people and focused on race, immigration and LGBT treatment, and 44% were seen before the election on the 8th November 2016 – some starting as early as 2015.

The new feature, named ‘View Ads’ (bonus points to the genius behind that one), will enable anyone to click a single button on any Business Page which will then display all active ads across the three platforms (Facebook, Instagram and Messenger), even if the person looking is not in the target audience of that ad. It’s being rolled out in Canada first, with plans to extend this to the US by summer and hopefully all other countries will shortly follow suit.

facebook view ads tool for transparency screenshot

The difference with political ads moving forward is the extra layer of security, requiring buyers to verify their identities, and all election-related ads to include a disclosure that tells the consumer who they were “Paid for by”. Of course, you cry, there will be hundreds of organisations that will point blank refuse to do this!? Well, Mark Zuckerberg announced the company’s plans to hire 1,000 people to review the content, context and targeting of adverts, as well as investing in machine learning to assist and automate the process.

Further steps Facebook is taking to manage the above include tightening restrictions on advertiser content and expanding their policies ”to prevent ads that use even more subtle expressions of violence”. What exactly Facebook classifies as ‘subtle violence’ is currently unclear. They also mention working together with other companies such as Twitter – who have also admitted to being affected by Russian interferers – as well as governments to share information of known malicious accounts, ads and the strategies troll use to banish them from every platform.

So, is this Facebook giving us a competitor analysis tool? Perhaps not, but it can only be a good thing. After all, no one can forget about that ad category disaster back in September (if you’re reading this Facebook, we still want targeting strategies as a reporting breakdown).

Related posts:

The post Are Facebook’s garden walls finally being knocked down? appeared first on Harvest Digital ™.

Friday Reading #117

Did everyone catch the Bake Off Final on Tuesday? No we don’t mean the C4 version, Prue Leith after a few gin and tonics spoiled that for us (but luckily not for the 8.8m who tuned in live – congrats to our friends at C4). Of course we’re talking about the Goodstuff Bake Off final – hosted here at Corinthian House, and featuring some unbelievable baking talent from across the agency.

The finals party brought together clients, media owners and the whole agency to watch a live technical challenge and the final showstopper. And show stopping they were, the talent was as huge as the cakes – but ultimately Carmen’s witches cauldron cast a spell on the judges to take home the crown. But more importantly, the event managed to raise over £1000 for our wonderful charities Alzheimer’s Society and SWAN UK.

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Despite the slightly demonic appearance, these drawings are in fact useful models to make your presentations better. The information monster is the deck we’re all too familiar with, with hundreds of text dense charts – overwhelming you with information and failing to land any of it. The story rainbow is what it could be, based around the singular idea you want to communicate – structured as a narrative, with three key acts. The full article over at Quartz is packed with useful tips, starting points and things to consider to nail that 4pm on a Friday graveyard slot.

Love
podcasts? Have 100 or so spare hours to check out the best the format has to
offer? Reddit user Scarscrabble has listened to ‘way too many podcasts’ and
created the definitive list of the 100 top podcasts with descriptions
personal favourites include 99% invisible, My Dad Wrote a Porno (coming in at a
strong 7th) and Hello Internet. Can you find yours?

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Remember clipart? The indispensable way to liven up any document in the 1990′s was Microsoft’s library of hundreds of thousands of ready made cartoons. Looking to fill a hole in our hearts, Google have recently unveiled Poly, their free online library of 3d objects – clipart for the VR generation. In much the same way clipart was able to fast track the development of graphic design computing, Google are undoubtedly hoping that Poly will kickstart a new category of graphics.

2017 has
been the year that the power of the ‘Frightful Five’, Amazon, Apple, Facebook,
Google and Microsoft, has come into stark relief. Each of them own a
massive chunk of the digital world we live in; from commerce, to our social
lives, the collective knowledge of the internet and every computer that runs it.
However, none of them has made much of a dent into the lucrative world of entertainment
– Amazon fails to get their hit show, Google’s YouTube hasn’t made much of an
inroads into long-form content, Microsoft quietly closed down its own
entertainment studio and Apple and Facebook talk big but it’s always around the
corner. Is this sector out of the grasp of the big five?

How can
digital advertising engage, rather than simply target? The digital landscape is facing
a significant obstacle at the moment as audiences around the world increasingly associate online ads with spam and fake news, and feel that ads are intrusive and
interruptive.

This
means that digital as we know it is facing a pivotal change in our
communication with audiences: PSFK argue a shift of focus may be required to build uninterrupted engagement and relationships, rather than overzealous use
of pre-rolls and MPUs. This aligns with trends like the rise of branded
podcasts for long-term success for building a brand. From digital perspective,
we must start thinking about how we engage rather than simply target.