What Marketers Can Learn From Amazon’s Black Friday Performance

Coming into Black Friday this year, expectations were somewhat grim. Retailers have been rapidly extending discounting season to include much of November and December, and there were concerns that consumers would be either overwhelmed with deals, or simply lose the urgency. These concerns didn’t prove accurate, as sales across Thanksgiving and Black Friday were up 17.9% over last year, setting new records as consumers flocked to deals. Noticeably, there have been changes in how consumers are shopping, though, and how brands can make certain they’re capturing as many of the consumers across the weekend as possible. Brands should be mindful of the content they’re creating and make sure they’re putting the right messaging in front of the consumer, in the right places, to drive conversion.

 

The Right Ecommerce Balance

For the first year, mobile sales have managed to live up to their mindshare. According to Adobe Analytics, 60% of retail visits and 46% of spending came from mobile devices. Last year, less than 30% of spending came from mobile devices. With this growth rate, it’s likely that mobile spending grows larger than desktop spending in 2018. However, on Cyber Monday, only 47% of visits and 33% of revenue came from mobile devices. It seems people are browsing while on mobile while off from work and out with family, but doing their shopping from desktop devices while at work on Monday. Brands can take advantage of this by focusing their spend on mobile friendly ad units on Amazon during the week of Black Friday and diving deep into the Amazon app. Come Monday, the some of the spend should shift from the app to units spread around Amazon.com.

Follow Amazon’s Lead

Amazon remains the dominant e-commerce destination, as it seized upwards of 50% of Black Friday sales, according to GBH Insights. Brands can learn from Amazon’s messaging and how it drove sales across its platform. As always, Amazon’s most prominent advertising was dominated by Amazon’s own ads, as Amazon prioritizes its own goods and categories in its best placements. These ads were all carefully tailored to the Friday and Monday shopping holidays, with very distinct holiday messaging and specific discount call-outs. The ads called out whether a product was $50 off, or whether a category featured deals up to 30% off, complete with holiday imagery. By contrast, few brands went to the effort of tailoring their Amazon ads with explicit holiday messaging. Brands were often running generic ads over holiday ads, and rarely drawing attention to the size of their discounts. As Amazon’s ads and platform sales reflect, Black Friday shopping behavor is driven by deals. Next year, brands should build their ad into their creative and make certain they call out their discount directly within the ad itself. Don’t make the consumer click through to the PDP to see the deal, entice them to click through because of the deal.

Get in the Holiday Spirit  

Given how dominant Amazon is, having captured 37% of the five day holiday period in 2016 and 36% in 2015, it was surprising to see how much more effort brands appeared to spend on their own brand site’s content over Amazon’s. For instance, Neutrogena ran several ads on Amazon, all of which were seasonally generic. Neutrogena.com, however, featured custom creative for the holiday weekend. Similarly, one of the top deals across the weekend was for the Fitbit Charge 2, which was discounted from $149 to $99 on several sites. Creative on the Amazon Product Detail Page remained static, while banner ads lacked the call to action of the deal. Fitbit.com, however, had custom creative and a great deal of information regarding the deal. This past Halloween, several cosmetics companies experienced a surge in sales by updating their pages to incorporate content relevant to Halloween. Knowing the conversion a simple seasonal imagery update can generate, it was surprising to see so few brands do the same for Black Friday. Creating new and custom content can be costly, but can create a real uptick in conversion. Brands should develop this content ahead of time and produce it alongside the creative they’re putting on their sites to reduce costs and keep the brand holiday theme across channels.

Black Friday and Cyber Monday remain a growing, and powerful, weekend for brands, and require a powerful advertising strategy to match. Sales were up considerably, but brands are still vying against each other for consumer’s attention. Next year, or even more immediately for 2018’s major shopping holidays, marketers should create custom content for the holiday both on Amazon, as well as their own site, emphasize the deal in ad creative and balance their placements to reflect modern consumer purchasing behaviors. If Black Friday and Cyber Monday 2017 are any indication, the shopping power of this holiday weekend is only likely to grow more, as is the share and attention being captured by Amazon.

The post What Marketers Can Learn From Amazon’s Black Friday Performance appeared first on 360i Digital Agency Blog.

Maxmising the media mix

 

Insights:

Maxmising the media mix

With zero-based budgets and cost efficiency on everyone’s mind, there is a big focus on reactive, targeted media at the moment. A lot of people have been promoting its value, which for our part has included thought leadership on channels like programmatic advertising and time/geo-targeted SMS messaging.

These channels have a real place in the marketing mix but there is a subsequent trend emerging in the industry. Increasingly, brands are using hyper-targeted digital channels in place of tried and tested media. You will have no doubt seen Adidas in the news this month doing just that, with their CEO announcing an exclusively online approach to their marketing.

At Capture, we believe that there is real value to be found in the more innovative channels, but when used as an addition and not an alternative to traditional advertising. As far as the shopper is concerned, “retailer-owned” media remains fundamental, with third-party options fulfilling different objectives in most cases.

Since we’ve worked on over 4,000 campaigns in our time, we’ve looked at our evaluations database* to show the value that “retailer-owned” media offers and who does it best.
What do we mean by “retailer-owned” media?

We are talking the channels booked directly with the retailer or their appointed media centre. They sit separately to the cross-retail opportunities and include; Security Gates, Bollards, Trolley Bays, Radio, Car Park Banners and Fixture Media. Otherwise known as core media.

How does it measure up vs “new” media?

Campaign data shows that “new media” works well to drive sales during the test period. This is to be expected, with these channels often used to drive sales for a targeted group at a relevant time.

If you are sending a targeted SMS in proximity to store it makes sense to see immediate uplift for a product that’s of interest to the shopper. What is interesting, however, is that it is the “retailer-owned” media that wins when it comes to longer-term sales uplift. In other words, the impact continues 4-6 weeks post the live period.

That’s an uplift that is reflected in the long-term ROI, with “retailer-owned” channels delivering a return that is, on average, 52.4% higher than “new media” at a featured SKU level, and 39.7% higher at a brand level.

So, what’s going on?

“New channels” by their nature of happening in real time are instantaneous, and therefore attract a more impulsive purchase. This means they don’t provide the longevity or mass share of voice that their more traditional counterparts do.

Think about how many people pass a store entrance gate in the space of a week. Then think about the perceived endorsement and visual impact a co-branded front of store channel creates. It positions the product as one the retailer wants to be shouting about, appealing to the retailer’s audience not just the supposed brand / product audience.

Brands should keep this in mind, remembering the opportunity that “retailer-owned” channels present in growing your shopper base. Your source of growth is almost always bigger than your prime prospect, meaning broadcast channels aren’t something you should necessarily cut in a bid to reduce advertising wastage. We think the two work best when hand in hand. Driving audience efficiencies with the new channels that allow it, while using “retailer-owned” to build wider awareness and secure your product in shopper’s longer term consideration set. And of course, you can still drive efficiencies in this area.

 

Who does it best?

Compared to the rest of the market, our database puts Asda top across a whole host of metrics.

  1. Across the board, Asda owned media is on average 25% more cost effective than the total market
  2. Asda Fixture Media is 9.7 percentage points more effective at driving featured SKU sales in the test period and 6.4 percentage points more effective in the long-term than the rest of the market. This combined with a comparatively low CPM equates to an average long-term ROI of £2.75 vs a market average of £1.64. At a brand level, it’s an even better story, with an average long-term ROI of £7.25
  3. For Front of Store media, Asda scores higher than the market for Featured SKU uplift in the test period and for long-term ROI. At a brand level, it delivers better uplift for both test and long-term measures. This is largely down to cost effective choices and brandability that simply aren’t available in other retailers.

Best performing front of store media channels

It’s all well and good saying Asda do best, but what is it that’s putting them first? We’ve selected the top two performing channels for front of store.

  1. Trolley Bay Posters
    • What the data says:
    • 22.2% Average featured SKU uplift (test)
    • 19.4% Average featured SKU uplift (Long-term)
    • £4.22 Average brand ROI (long-term) Why we think they work: Trolley Bays offer huge impact, being very brandable and providing brands with a considerable share of voice given their size and presence.
  2. Bollard Covers
    • What the data says:
    • 18.4% Average featured SKU uplift (test)
    • 14.5% Average featured SKU uplift (Long-term)
    • £2.87 Average brand ROI (long-term)
    • Why we think they work: Bollards reach the shopper just as they enter, with a minimum of 4 bollards per store creating a great impact and stand out when it matters.

What Capture recommend

We don’t think it’s an either-or situation when it comes to planning your media. Brands need to align ad spend with their objectives and set clear and fair effectiveness measures for each part of the marketing plan.

Be careful not to disregard a media channel through comparison to one that serves a different purpose.

Give us a shout if you would like more information on making the most for your brands  hello@capturemarketing.co.uk

 

 

The post Maxmising the media mix appeared first on Capture.

The Veggie Revolution

 

Insights:

The veggie revolution

 

Post the festive season, the calendar is full of one day events that drive significant footfall to retailers. Mother’s Day is the most popular occasion second only to Christmas. This is followed by Easter, Valentine’s Day, Father’s Day and Pancake Day.

With most shopper spend planned in the week leading up to or on the day itself, grocery is increasingly relevant to one day events. It addresses the “right here right now” mindset of shoppers, with essential items like food and gifting now forming part of weekly shops and top up missions. Since pancake day is approaching we have pulled together top tips on how to maximise brand impact for one day only events.

With zero-based budgets and cost efficiency on everyone’s mind, there is a big focus on reactive, targeted media at the moment. A lot of people have been promoting its value, which for our part has included thought leadership on channels like programmatic advertising and time/geo-targeted SMS messaging.

These channels have a real place in the marketing mix but there is a subsequent trend emerging in the industry. Increasingly, brands are using hyper-targeted digital channels in place of tried and tested media. You will have no doubt seen Adidas in the news this month doing just that, with their CEO announcing an exclusively online approach to their marketing.

At Capture, we believe that there is real value to be found in the more innovative channels, but when used as an addition and not an alternative to traditional advertising. As far as the shopper is concerned, “retailer-owned” media remains fundamental, with third-party options fulfilling different objectives in most cases.

Since we’ve worked on over 4,000 campaigns in our time, we’ve looked at our evaluations database* to show the value that “retailer-owned” media offers and who does it best.
What do we mean by “retailer-owned” media?

We are talking the channels booked directly with the retailer or their appointed media centre. They sit separately to the cross-retail opportunities and include; Security Gates, Bollards, Trolley Bays, Radio, Car Park Banners and Fixture Media. Otherwise known as core media.

How does it measure up vs “new” media?

Campaign data shows that “new media” works well to drive sales during the test period. This is to be expected, with these channels often used to drive sales for a targeted group at a relevant time.

If you are sending a targeted SMS in proximity to store it makes sense to see immediate uplift for a product that’s of interest to the shopper. What is interesting, however, is that it is the “retailer-owned” media that wins when it comes to longer-term sales uplift. In other words, the impact continues 4-6 weeks post the live period.

That’s an uplift that is reflected in the long-term ROI, with “retailer-owned” channels delivering a return that is, on average, 52.4% higher than “new media” at a featured SKU level, and 39.7% higher at a brand level.

So, what’s going on?

“New channels” by their nature of happening in real time are instantaneous, and therefore attract a more impulsive purchase. This means they don’t provide the longevity or mass share of voice that their more traditional counterparts do.

Think about how many people pass a store entrance gate in the space of a week. Then think about the perceived endorsement and visual impact a co-branded front of store channel creates. It positions the product as one the retailer wants to be shouting about, appealing to the retailer’s audience not just the supposed brand / product audience.

Brands should keep this in mind, remembering the opportunity that “retailer-owned” channels present in growing your shopper base. Your source of growth is almost always bigger than your prime prospect, meaning broadcast channels aren’t something you should necessarily cut in a bid to reduce advertising wastage.

We think the two work best when hand in hand. Driving audience efficiencies with the new channels that allow it, while using “retailer-owned” to build wider awareness and secure your product in shopper’s longer term consideration set.

And of course, you can still drive efficiencies in this area.

Who does it best?

Compared to the rest of the market, our database puts Asda top across a whole host of metrics.

  1. Across the board, Asda owned media is on average 25% more cost effective than the total market
  2. Asda Fixture Media is 9.7 percentage points more effective at driving featured SKU sales in the test period and 6.4 percentage points more effective in the long-term than the rest of the market. This combined with a comparatively low CPM equates to an average long-term ROI of £2.75 vs a market average of £1.64. At a brand level, it’s an even better story, with an average long-term ROI of £7.25
  3. For Front of Store media, Asda scores higher than the market for Featured SKU uplift in the test period and for long-term ROI. At a brand level, it delivers better uplift for both test and long-term measures. This is largely down to cost effective choices and brandability that simply aren’t available in other retailers.

Best performing front of store media channels

It’s all well and good saying Asda do best, but what is it that’s putting them first? We’ve selected the top two performing channels for front of store.

  1. Trolley Bay Posters
    • What the data says:
    • 22.2% Average featured SKU uplift (test)
    • 19.4% Average featured SKU uplift (Long-term)
    • £4.22 Average brand ROI (long-term) Why we think they work: Trolley Bays offer huge impact, being very brandable and providing brands with a considerable share of voice given their size and presence.
  2. Bollard Covers
    • What the data says:
    • 18.4% Average featured SKU uplift (test)
    • 14.5% Average featured SKU uplift (Long-term)
    • £2.87 Average brand ROI (long-term)
    • Why we think they work: Bollards reach the shopper just as they enter, with a minimum of 4 bollards per store creating a great impact and stand out when it matters.

What we recommend

We don’t think it’s an either-or situation when it comes to planning your media. Brands need to align ad spend with their objectives and set clear and fair effectiveness measures for each part of the marketing plan.

Be careful not to disregard a media channel through comparison to one that serves a different purpose.

Give us a shout if you would like more information on making the most for your brands  hello@capturemarketing.co.uk

 

 

The post The Veggie Revolution appeared first on Capture.

Identity in the Big Data Age

Cast your minds back fifteen years to the start of The Bourne Identity. Matt Damon is floating in a vast and stormy sea, adrift without any recollection of his past. He is plucked out of the waves by crew on a fishing boat, who nurse him back to health and discover vague, coded clues to who he really is. And that kicks off his journey.

In many ways, this is how customers used to be, for many brands online and off. Someone would show up in a store, and unless they were regulars, a brand would have little to no idea of their background, whether they had shopped there before, or their specific needs or wants. Online, identities were even more opaque – often just tagged by the most general of cookies or reliant on sign-ins.

Clearly, this is no longer the case. We are no longer adrift in a sea of Big Data with no identifying features. If brands are smart and switched on, they know who we are, even across device. Of course, that would have made for a much shorter, less interesting movie franchise.

You may hate the term, I certainly don’t revere it, but what the term Big Data encapsulates is the growing volume, variety, velocity and challenging validity of data today. In that sense, without the hyperbole, the term works just fine for me with data generated from practically everywhere, from social media to purchase transactions to so many more. The data offers enormous potential to drive customer-centricity, innovation, productivity, efficiency and growth through actionable insights for all industry sectors.

However, when it comes to the people-based aspects of Big Data, the huge benefits of identity recognition and customer management strategies in making marketing personal, must be reconciled with increased risks to individuals’ privacy. For example, the relatively recent emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT) has and will continue to cause an explosion in the volume of data generated and while connecting fridges and washing machines to our lives is claimed to bring disruptive benefits to us as consumers, it is also likely to have a disruptive effect on our personal data.

Under privacy laws or data protection laws, if you’re not dealing with any personal data, you’re outside of the legislation. However, these days, there are so few organisations that don’t interact with the customer and the line is no longer as clear as we might have thought it was. Privacy and anonymity gets complicated in the age of Big Data.

The impending General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and ePrivacy directive are both going to be incredibly influential in the way that people think about identity. When GDPR comes into force next May, it will reinforce the need for clear identity resolution for Personally Identifiable Information (PII) in some use cases and for pseudonymisation in other use cases, to address privacy and anonymity requirements.  The GDPR will demand the protection of personal information in each case and companies must be clear about how best to use what approach, when and under what circumstances, it is privacy-safe to link the two in order to create a true single customer view and joined up customer experience.

While it has been said that Big Data is the gold rush of our digital age, it does not mean, and it should not be, at the expense of personal privacy. As ‘our internet’ grows and develops, customer identity is everything. You simply can’t deliver the best, seamless and most relevant experiences to your customers without the right data foundation – and that right data foundation has to be rooted in a respect for the information held, the law and the individual’s needs.

It’s great to tie all data points back to a user’s identity, in order to drive greater value to the consumer. But, as we move forward into a GDPR and ePrivacy directive-regulated future, it is imperative that all marketers, database users, and CRM professionals remember, most consumers don’t care about Big Data,  their north star centres on the data being legally obtained, kept safe and used in their very best interests. It is somewhat ironic that the best way we can do that is to focus on the one thing that matters to them most, their identity.

Read more posts from Jed Mole at iabuk.net

Would you rather create a connection or sell a product?

We’ve been talking about emotion selling products for so long now, that it’s almost become second nature to most brands. Create a story, tell the narrative, use emotion and create experinces for your consumers and eventually, they will buy. However, a recent report from Marketing Week highlights that in some instances brands have invested in customer experience and they’ve seen sales dip. It’s not paying off anymore. It got us thinking, is it just a temporary lull in sales, or are consumers cottoning on to the fact that brands are essentially trying to manipulate their emotions and they’re no longer buying? And if that is the case, do we give up on our emotional stories and hit them with the traditional hard sell?

A few weeks ago we wrote about the recent Trivago campaign and how it was as basic as you could get, but how it also was a phenomenal success, and now looking back we’re wondering if that was a premonition to the next trend to hit the advertising world. Maybe it is time to strip it all back, take away the bells and whistles and just tell people what the product is. McDonalds recently did this in their coffee advert, poking fun at the culture of customer experience and instead, delivered a great coffee without all the fuss. Using humour to insinuate that if the product is good enough, it will sell itself.

After much debate in the house of Live & Breathe, incidentally, over many cups of coffee, the prevailing thought was this; we can’t do without the emotion because we’ve gone too far down the garden path to turn back now. Even if we could, we don’t think we would. Whether we like it or not, and regardless of the dips in performance that inevitably will come, emotion is the foundation of everything we do. Even the McDonalds advert is using humour and peoples’ frustration with hipster culture to create a sell. There is a clear emotional pull, and emotion doesn’t mean weeping over the latest heartbreak advert. It’s often something that resonates within us to create a feeling of affinity with a brand. But a feeling is what it does indeed create.

If brands start churning out advertising campaigns that hark back to ye olde days of television when a gruff voice over hurriedly described the product in thirty seconds or less, the chances are that sales will plummet. Because advertising today isn’t about grabbing attention like it once was. If attention was all you had to get you’d be laughing all the way to the bank. Instead, we’re tasked with winning hearts and minds. Engaging consumers in ways we haven’t previously, as well as trying to get their attention in a world that is nosier than it has ever been. Describing a product just won’t cut it.

Emotion will. Some kind of shared feeling. A connection. A community that bands together in their frustrations. A sense of belonging and family. Something, that tells people you are not alone, we all feel like this, and we’re a brand that will help you feel better. That’s essentially what it all comes down to, and you can strip back your advertising and marketing strategies all you like, but you still need to covey those feelings if you hope to shift your product off the shelves.

The post Would you rather create a connection or sell a product? appeared first on Live & Breathe.

Media Training is Vital to Your Brand’s Success

Public relation professionals should be pros at media, but their clients may not have gotten to that point yet, and it’s up to their PR people to help them improve. Many studies over the years have shown that one of people’s top fears is of public speaking. So, it should not be surprising to anyone that many leaders of companies, even big companies, sometimes get nervous about speaking in front of a group of people. But it’s not possible to hide away and shift all the responsibility to someone else when you are the leader. Leaders need to lead, even in dealing with the media and talking in front of others.

Practice

Of course, the training needs to happen, but like almost everything, we get better as we practice doing it right… practice done wrong will not lead to improvement though. So a big part of media training should be putting the student in front of others who will ask them random questions. Let them answer completely. Then stop and find out what the group suggests as a different approach, including bad ones. It’s easier to learn what should happen when both the pros and cons are open for analysis.

Prep Time Before the Real Thing

Go into any interview or media presentation with every bit of knowledge you can think of regarding the topic, your organization, and any current events that might be tied to your industry. When you know the answers, it’s much more effective than floundering. But also practice the handy little phrase. “I’m not sure of the exact answer off the top of my head. Will you leave your contact information with my assistant and I will get back to you with that information.” Then you need to follow through with that promise quickly.

  • Take a fact sheet showing detailed information as you go to any interview, this is especially helpful when the interview is about a specific situation or topic.
  • Stand if addressing a group, sit if you are in a one-on-one discussion.
  • If you are going to be filmed, dress professionally. For radio, podcasts, or print interviews, you can be a little more relaxed in how you dress, but you still want to be professional, so if they are filming, suit and tie for a man are good, for the others, still a suit jacket and button-up shirt or nice turtleneck will work well.
  • Figure out a few “sound bites” you can use to make your points. No need to use them all, but if you have five of them, it gives you the option of which ones to use during any interview.
  • Find out the length of the interview so you can cover the most important points in your time frame. Always have more than enough to share, but hit the big items before your time runs out.

When it’s Over

When it is completed, then it’s time to review. What could have been done to better effect, what would you change for the next time. If it was filmed, see if you can get a copy so you can check how you come across to the camera. Whatever else you can think of that might be improved the next time. That’s the way to become an expert at media interviews.

The post Media Training is Vital to Your Brand’s Success appeared first on 5W PR News and Updates, NY Public Relations Agency Blog.

Flipping the lid on one day only events

 

Insights:

Flipping the lid on the one day only events

 

Charlotte Davis / Client Manager

Post the festive season, the calendar is full of one day events that drive significant footfall to retailers. Mother’s Day is the most popular occasion second only to Christmas. This is followed by Easter, Valentine’s Day, Father’s Day and Pancake Day.

With most shopper spend planned in the week leading up to or on the day itself, grocery is increasingly relevant to one day events. It addresses the “right here right now” mindset of shoppers, with essential items like food and gifting now forming part of weekly shops and top up missions. Since pancake day is approaching we have pulled together top tips on how to maximise brand impact for one day only events.

Leverage the occasion to win new shoppers

One day events are a chance to drive relevance for your brand and bring new shoppers in. Pancake day is the perfect example of this, leading non-bakers to an aisle they don’t typically visit. Brands should leverage the occasion and inspire shoppers to use their products post the event. If they are going to buy eggs any way, why not encourage purchase of a bigger pack size?

Recipe ideas that feature eggs and help to mix up meal times can inspire a new perspective on the product, meaning shoppers are more likely to visit the aisle outside of the occasion. Definitely food for thought!

Plan for longevity

With most spend taking place in the week leading up to the event, be smart with your campaign. Going early will likely do little for your brand when people aren’t actively shopping event items.

Since most in-store channels have a three-week live period, we recommend bookending your media around the event. Doing this ensures you have visibility when it matters while prompting repeat purchase. One thing to keep in mind when taking this approach is how your campaign stays relevant.

We think messaging that doesn’t explicitly mention the event while evoking the occasion is a great way to do this.

Think outside of the box

One day events have an affinity with dining in, especially when they fall midweek like this year’s Valentine’s Day. Own label dine in deals are in huge demand when eating out just isn’t an option.

Branded partnerships are a great way to steal some of this spend from own label, especially If your brand is positioned as premium or indulgent. Partnering with a complimentary product increases your relevance to the event while being a cost-effective way to get cross category exposure.

Let us know if you’d like to hear more on the power of partnerships!

Create stand out in-store

Retailers often take a single-minded approach to one day events, making it hard to get cut through in-store.

If you’re not involved in an events package, its important you invest across the path to purchase to ensure you’re converting the customer. Couple high reach media that puts your product front of mind with fixture presence to signpost your product. To maximise the effect, build in around store communications to reinforce your message and drive footfall to the aisle.  Stacking media and tailoring the message is a great way to create impact and get stand out.

Don’t forget about online

Online has a big role to play in the right here right now mentality. Think about opportunities that put your product front of mind when people are shopping the event. Activity on favorites and relevant search terms are a cost effective way of creating stand out when it matters most.

One Day calendar events are increasingly relevant for grocery. Give us a shout if you would like more information on making the most for your brands  hello@capturemarketing.co.uk

 

 

The post Flipping the lid on one day only events appeared first on Capture.