How Brands Can Easily Create Successful Instagram Stories

By Mikey Dunn, Paid Social Coordinator

In late 2006, Facebook introduced the dominant format for social media content with the News Feed. Instead of bouncing between profiles, an algorithm would present the content that mattered most to users in a scrollable feed. This function became even more entrenched with the growth of smartphones and swiping/scrolling became integral to consumers.

Then In late 2013, Snapchat introduced a new content format for its photo and video snaps called Stories. Three years later, Instagram copied the new format and added in a few new features and twists. Today, Stories are the latest and most exciting medium for content on mobile, presenting a large opportunity for brands.

Snapchat or Instagram?

While the two platforms present a similar user experience with their Stories, there are still some important differences.

The main consideration?  Instagram Stories are ultimately more brand-friendly for organic content. Brands can grow followers to reach an audience more easily as well as organically. Additionally, Instagram is friendlier toward content that is uploaded to a Story — Snapchat shrinks the display size and shows that the media was “uploaded from Camera Roll,” which can be seen as distracting and out of place.

Tools & Features Brands Should Use for Their Stories

Pixelgarde (App): Instagram currently has a limitation that media (uploaded from the Camera Roll to Story) must be created within 24 hours. This can pose an issue if your brand’s content is staged and photographed, rather than shot spontaneously on a phone. With the Pixelgarde app, the metadata for any photo or video in the Camera Roll can be edited, making the media instantly compatible. This guarantees that you can post your content exactly when you want to.

Links (Instagram): In mid-summer 2017, both Instagram and Snapchat introduced the ability for any account to link their Stories to outside webpages. This is huge for brands and can be key to driving your audience to watch more content, enter a sweepstakes, or make a purchase.

Mentions (Instagram): This is a feature Snapchat Stories completely lacks. By typing an Instagram’s handle on an Instagram Story, that account will be officially tagged. This is great for partnerships with other brands, or for featuring influencers.

And Then, There Are Paid Ads Within Stories

Both Instagram and Snapchat have their own self-serve ad platforms. These essentially allow you to run mid-roll ads in between Stories clips on either platform. Instagram ads can be done via Facebook Ads Manager or Power Editor, while Snapchat has recently launched its own native platform.

No matter what your brand’s goals and budgets, the sheer popularity of Stories suggests that brands need to start developing a strategy around this new format. Now is the perfect time for brands to make a mark with innovative and fun Stories.

Contact the Likeable Media team to learn more! Interested in reading about more photo editing tools, check out our previous blog here!  


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How Brands Can Easily Create Successful Instagram Stories

By Mikey Dunn, Paid Social Coordinator

In late 2006, Facebook introduced the dominant format for social media content with the News Feed. Instead of bouncing between profiles, an algorithm would present the content that mattered most to users in a scrollable feed. This function became even more entrenched with the growth of smartphones and swiping/scrolling became integral to consumers.

Then In late 2013, Snapchat introduced a new content format for its photo and video snaps called Stories. Three years later, Instagram copied the new format and added in a few new features and twists. Today, Stories are the latest and most exciting medium for content on mobile, presenting a large opportunity for brands.

Snapchat or Instagram?

While the two platforms present a similar user experience with their Stories, there are still some important differences.

The main consideration?  Instagram Stories are ultimately more brand-friendly for organic content. Brands can grow followers to reach an audience more easily as well as organically. Additionally, Instagram is friendlier toward content that is uploaded to a Story — Snapchat shrinks the display size and shows that the media was “uploaded from Camera Roll,” which can be seen as distracting and out of place.

Tools & Features Brands Should Use for Their Stories

Pixelgarde (App): Instagram currently has a limitation that media (uploaded from the Camera Roll to Story) must be created within 24 hours. This can pose an issue if your brand’s content is staged and photographed, rather than shot spontaneously on a phone. With the Pixelgarde app, the metadata for any photo or video in the Camera Roll can be edited, making the media instantly compatible. This guarantees that you can post your content exactly when you want to.

Links (Instagram): In mid-summer 2017, both Instagram and Snapchat introduced the ability for any account to link their Stories to outside webpages. This is huge for brands and can be key to driving your audience to watch more content, enter a sweepstakes, or make a purchase.

Mentions (Instagram): This is a feature Snapchat Stories completely lacks. By typing an Instagram’s handle on an Instagram Story, that account will be officially tagged. This is great for partnerships with other brands, or for featuring influencers.

And Then, There Are Paid Ads Within Stories

Both Instagram and Snapchat have their own self-serve ad platforms. These essentially allow you to run mid-roll ads in between Stories clips on either platform. Instagram ads can be done via Facebook Ads Manager or Power Editor, while Snapchat has recently launched its own native platform.

No matter what your brand’s goals and budgets, the sheer popularity of Stories suggests that brands need to start developing a strategy around this new format. Now is the perfect time for brands to make a mark with innovative and fun Stories.

Contact the Likeable Media team to learn more! Interested in reading about more photo editing tools, check out our previous blog here!  


We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

MullenLowe Peru Rebrands to 511 and Unveils New Innovation and Content Lab

MullenLowe Group announced today the rebranding of MullenLowe Peru to MullenLowe 511 to symbolize the agency’s evolution and the launch of its new Innovation and Content Lab.

MullenLowe 511 will continue to be led by CEO César Benavides and VP, Operations, Paco Torrico. Since the agency’s founding three years ago, it has experienced impressive growth, and now numbers 100 staff and has added key brands such as ABInBev with Guaraná, Nike, Suzuki and Unilever, amongst others.

On the launch of the new Innovation and Content Lab, MullenLowe 511 VP, Operations Torrico comments, “The Lab will go beyond our clients’ everyday needs to provide an opportunity for a deep dive into the brand ecosystem, while identifying the disruptive and relevant forms of communication that strengthen the relationship between the company and its consumers. Based on a new process of research and idea development, this dedicated team will find and create new experiences within digital and social, experiential, entertainment content generation (music, gaming, sports), innovative point-of-sale, new media, and co-branding partnership opportunities.”

The lab will be headed by Rodrigo Melgar, who was recently with Havas Tribu Costa Rica and has also been a creative director in several agencies in Lima. He will work closely with Leandro Raggio, the agency’s creative director, and with the heads of client service, planning and digital.

“We thought this new name would reflect our origin as well as our strong identity and unique personality,” added MullenLowe 511 CEO, Benavides. “It’s an exciting and energizing time for our us as we strengthen our offering and ensure that the work we create exceeds campaign goals and drives an unfair share of attention for our clients’ brands.”

The rebranding and the creation of the Innovation and Content Lab reflects and reinforces the beginning of a new phase. The name MullenLowe 511 comes with special significance, as it represents both the area code for Peru (51) and Lima (1).

The post MullenLowe Peru Rebrands to 511 and Unveils New Innovation and Content Lab appeared first on MullenLowe Group.

China’s Live-streaming Trend: Paving the Way for Increased Engagement

By Glenn Osaki, President, Asia, Shanghai, China, MSL and Liki Qin, Regional Senior Manager, Asia, MSL 2016 will be known as the dawn of the era of live-streaming in China, with over 325 million users — about half of the entire online population of China, according to the China Internet Network Information Center. As the […]

The post China’s Live-streaming Trend: Paving the Way for Increased Engagement appeared first on MSLGROUP’s Blog Critical Conversations: Critical Conversations.

PR – Driven Media: Hero of The Day

By Guillaume Herbette, Global CEO, MSL Every brand is a media company now. This message has undoubtedly been instilled in every communications and marketing professional. And what it means is that every brand must create content – lots of it on various platforms – if they want to influence consumers. This is a very exciting […]

The post PR – Driven Media: Hero of The Day appeared first on MSLGROUP’s Blog Critical Conversations: Critical Conversations.

In conversation with… Owl & Dog Playbooks

 

So, what’s your story?

Owl & Dog are Yeonju Yang and Claudio Ripol. Designers by trade, we have worked for a number of years for corporate clients on a wide range of products, spaces and branding from our London-based design studio Yang Ripol Design.

We always liked designing toys, and one day we had the idea of developing a cardboard-based toy, and it led to adding a story, and then became something between a toy and a book. It happened very quickly, and now we have five books published so far and are working on more publications.

Although we are very new to this industry, we are fascinated by the possibilities when you look at books with an open mind – not as a set format, but as an object. 

 

How did you develop a love for making books?

It started when we were reading books to our son. We really liked the physical interaction with a book, the bond between a child and a parent: the theatricality and role playing involved in the process.

This is something very special that I can’t replace with screen-based content. We love children’s books, and only after we had stumbled upon the idea of making a mask-book we realised we could provide something new in the market – not only the mask but the idea behind it.

Books are very rewarding as the development process can be very quick if you are a small publisher, and the result is also a democratic object that can be enjoyed by anyone.

 

What techniques do you use?

There are three aspects which make up a children book: text, Illustration and format.

We use various tools and methods depending on the title, but our process always starts with the format of the book. We design how it will fold out and how it can transform. We might have an idea of the content at this point, but it is very flexible.

From then on, we decide a fixed number of pages, shapes and size, and we start developing the story and the illustrations, which in turn affect the format again.

This means that during the process of creation we keep the three concepts flexible and interactive, all the way to the end. This is challenging as it means the artist, the writer and the designer need to be constantly challenged and ready to update during the whole process.

 

Which one are you most proud of, and why?

It is difficult choose just one, as they all work differently. I think The Adventures of 3 Bears has had the most impact on customers, and seeing someone’s face light up when they interact with it is very rewarding.

 

What’s the story behind one or more of the works in this gallery?

The Adventures of 3 Bears was a development of the Guess Who! idea; a mask book. Where Guess Who! had been a quick riddle, and a very simple mask, this time we set out to achieve a storyline as well as a volumetric mask. Something that was larger but still folded into a manageable format, both in terms of manufacturing and usability.

We initially worked out the way the mask would fold out, and then decided to have a three-book format. We also decided that bears were our preferred animal, as there could be variations of characters while keeping the same basic shape.

The stories are short, but with the basic premise of a fantastic, far-reaching journey to adventure, and back – just in time for the child to go to bed!

 

Remember, our 3×3 instagallery is refreshed every month. Catch our latest one hereOr see more of Owl and Dog’s work here.

 

Claudio and Yeonju Photo

Friday Reading #102

It’s been seven weeks of chiseled bods, glowing tans, drama, controversy, tears and turmoil – but now as Love Island is drawing to a close, the question of what we’re going to do with our evenings is high on the agenda. Thankfully we have Paul Gayfer’s promise to don the famous “Hunks in Trunks” budgie smugglers (if the show hit 1.5m for the first episode) to keep us entertained.


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NASA are releasing a series of old research videos for the first time, in an attempt to make their archives as public and accessible as possible. Around 300 are currently available to view online, some dating as far back as 1947. WIRED have collected 6 of the best released so far, and it’s fascinating to look back on some old space agency projects – some more successful than others. Highlights include the transport for the Atlantis Shuttle (reminiscent of Thunderbird 2) and a very dramatic, very intentional crashing of a Boeing 720. Not sure what the purpose of that last one actually was, but there’s plenty of explosions.

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Growing up is tough. But talking about growing up is
even tougher. The next generation are so absorbed with exploring the latest
social fads and digital trends, that it can often be difficult for a parent to
approach a child about things which make puberty really, really rubbish.

Well online cartoon network, Storybooth, have eliminated the
awkward ‘mUm GeT OuT I don’t wAnT to TaLk To You’ problem by creating a website
where kids and teenagers can semi-anonymously share whatever is troubling them
to a safe, online community. Their problems are then transformed into
light-hearted, shareable pieces of cartoon video content
.

The website covers a range of topics including (but not
limited to); periods, sex, bullying, parents, religion and sexuality.

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Required attention spans in media has been a relatively stable
thing for a while – films are over two hours, TV shows are 30-60 minutes, you might
read a newspaper article for five minutes and look at a poster for ten seconds. The
internet has complicated this – you might spend a few hours on a message board,
watch a six second clip, play an online game for marathon session or a mobile
game for 30 seconds. Tech companies have generally kept to clearly defined
attention spans – Netflix wants your attention for hours, while Twitter is
happy with a couple of minutes here or there. Facebook’s movement into long-form content
indicates the desire to grow out of short attention spans, and aim for the big
ad spends that long attention spans can offer.

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Apparently the World
Avocado Organisation
is a thing now, and they’re taking over London with a fleet
of avocado ‘Fruit of Life’ branded buses and cabs as part of the
European-wide avocado marketing campaign. The stunt is in partnership with
Costco & Tesco in the UK along with several others across Europe. As if
there’s not enough people already obsessed with the things the campaign aims to
push demand even further & in Europe for 2018 there is expected to be a
consumption of around 500 million kilos of Avocados.

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The global cultural phenomenon that is Game of Thrones started its final season on Monday – and Time magazine have dedicated an entire issue to everyone’s favourite fantasy epic. But rather than their more familiar chainmail and fur looks, for the cover shoot fashion photographer Miles Aldridge has designed a 80′s neon disco meets renaissance painters aesthetic. The carefully arranged portraiture contrasting with the blast of colour and velvet. It’s a brilliant example of flipping convention to create something far more memorable.