Friday Reading #103

It’s a very exciting day today at Goodstuff HQ, as we host another group of the best and brightest grads battling each other in a ring for the chance to join the ranks. Only the ring is a series of non-violent challenges, they work together rather than against each other and everyone gets pizza. We find it works better that way.


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The job of advertising is invariably to put the product or service in the best possible light, to find that enticing way of presenting it to make it more appealing than it’s competitors. But there’s a strong case for brands to flip this and instead admit their flaws, accept that their products aren’t perfect. Research shows that people are more likely to buy with 4.7 star review than 5 star on Amazon because they we seen as too good to be true. Richard Shotton makes a compelling case for wearing your imperfections proudly, for showing how it enables what your audience really care about. Guinness takes a long time to pour, but it’s better for it. Avis is second biggest, so they try harder. Hans Brinker openly admit to being an awful hotel, but they know you’ve not come to Amsterdam for a good night’s sleep.

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New York Police are trying to tackle the ever-growing
problem of ‘texting and driving’ by testing out a new piece of tech, the
Textalyzer. a piece of software which can be plugged into a driver’s phone
minutes after a car crash to indicate whether or not the driver had been using
their mobile in the moments that led up to an accident. Created by Israeli
security company, Cellebrite, the software can monitor the phones usage and can
decipher if the user had been messaging
, emailing and/or surfing the web before
a serious collision. Whilst it won’t be able to access actual information on
the phone such as pictures, personal emails or browsing history, some people are
sceptical of quite how private this information may truly be.

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It’s 10 years since Mad Men launched across the pond, opening
the golden era of TV that we’ve been experiencing ever since. Brian
Grubb writing in Upprox
reflects on how watching the pilot now ticks all the
boxes of the ‘peak TV’ era we’re approaching – the laser sharp writing, the
endless series finely tuned for that weekend binge and film like cinematography
that set the scene for Breaking Bad, The Walking Dead and others. What become a
trickle became a flood, with many shows launching with similar critical
accolades failing to make it past the first series (read Bates Motel, Manhattan
and Underground), which begs the question; now we know we’re in peak TV, what’s
next?

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Fancy a quick drink and a daily download?

News brand Mainichi has collaborated with Dentsu Toyko to create the
ultimate must have multi-tasker for Japanese millennials. The “News Bottle” was born out of the  market research finding that Japanese millennials purchase around two
bottles of water a day, making it a perfect uncharted space for the brand to
reach their audience in an innovative and useful way.

Flying the flag for the power of news brands and printed
media, they’ve figured out a way to print text with AR content on these water
bottles
, making it possible for consumers to see live news updates as they
swig.

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Disappointment and mourning descended across the internet
this week since the news that Microsoft Paint (est. 1985) would be no more as
of the next Windows update
. Instead it’s going to be replaced with a different
program called 3D paint. How on earth are we going to copy and paste now?
However, support from across the web convinced the tech giant to reconsider and
they have said that “MS Paint is here to stay, it will just have a new
home soon, in the Windows Store where it will be available for free.”

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