Friday Reading #102

It’s been seven weeks of chiseled bods, glowing tans, drama, controversy, tears and turmoil – but now as Love Island is drawing to a close, the question of what we’re going to do with our evenings is high on the agenda. Thankfully we have Paul Gayfer’s promise to don the famous “Hunks in Trunks” budgie smugglers (if the show hit 1.5m for the first episode) to keep us entertained.


image

NASA are releasing a series of old research videos for the first time, in an attempt to make their archives as public and accessible as possible. Around 300 are currently available to view online, some dating as far back as 1947. WIRED have collected 6 of the best released so far, and it’s fascinating to look back on some old space agency projects – some more successful than others. Highlights include the transport for the Atlantis Shuttle (reminiscent of Thunderbird 2) and a very dramatic, very intentional crashing of a Boeing 720. Not sure what the purpose of that last one actually was, but there’s plenty of explosions.

image

Growing up is tough. But talking about growing up is
even tougher. The next generation are so absorbed with exploring the latest
social fads and digital trends, that it can often be difficult for a parent to
approach a child about things which make puberty really, really rubbish.

Well online cartoon network, Storybooth, have eliminated the
awkward ‘mUm GeT OuT I don’t wAnT to TaLk To You’ problem by creating a website
where kids and teenagers can semi-anonymously share whatever is troubling them
to a safe, online community. Their problems are then transformed into
light-hearted, shareable pieces of cartoon video content
.

The website covers a range of topics including (but not
limited to); periods, sex, bullying, parents, religion and sexuality.

image

Required attention spans in media has been a relatively stable
thing for a while – films are over two hours, TV shows are 30-60 minutes, you might
read a newspaper article for five minutes and look at a poster for ten seconds. The
internet has complicated this – you might spend a few hours on a message board,
watch a six second clip, play an online game for marathon session or a mobile
game for 30 seconds. Tech companies have generally kept to clearly defined
attention spans – Netflix wants your attention for hours, while Twitter is
happy with a couple of minutes here or there. Facebook’s movement into long-form content
indicates the desire to grow out of short attention spans, and aim for the big
ad spends that long attention spans can offer.

image

Apparently the World
Avocado Organisation
is a thing now, and they’re taking over London with a fleet
of avocado ‘Fruit of Life’ branded buses and cabs as part of the
European-wide avocado marketing campaign. The stunt is in partnership with
Costco & Tesco in the UK along with several others across Europe. As if
there’s not enough people already obsessed with the things the campaign aims to
push demand even further & in Europe for 2018 there is expected to be a
consumption of around 500 million kilos of Avocados.

image

The global cultural phenomenon that is Game of Thrones started its final season on Monday – and Time magazine have dedicated an entire issue to everyone’s favourite fantasy epic. But rather than their more familiar chainmail and fur looks, for the cover shoot fashion photographer Miles Aldridge has designed a 80′s neon disco meets renaissance painters aesthetic. The carefully arranged portraiture contrasting with the blast of colour and velvet. It’s a brilliant example of flipping convention to create something far more memorable.

Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply