“Moonlight” Takes Best Picture After The Most Bizarre Moment In Oscar History

“Warren, what did you do?!”

“Warren, what did you do?!”

In quite possibly the most WTF moment in Oscar history, presenter Warren Beatty called out the wrong winner for Best Picture—and it wasn’t until the entire cast and crew of La La Land was on stage accepting their award that it was revealed they actually lost to Moonlight.

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Trump Feels The Wrath of Oscar In Jimmy Kimmel’s Funny, Fiery Opening Monologue

Jimmy Kimmel kicked off the Oscars with a series of digs at Donald Trump that set the tone for a politically charged Academy Award ceremony.

Jimmy Kimmel kicked off the Oscars with a series of digs at Donald Trump that set the tone for a politically charged Academy Award ceremony.

The question was never whether Jimmy Kimmel would make fun of Donald Trump in his opening monologue, but rather how much. The answer turned out to be: just the right amount.

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Iranian Filmmaker Asghar Farhadi Delivers Powerful Oscar Acceptance Speech In Absentia

“The Salesman” director declined to attend because of President Trump’s Muslim ban—but that didn’t stop him from making a statement.

“The Salesman” director declined to attend because of President Trump’s Muslim ban—but that didn’t stop him from making a statement.

Filmmaker Asghar Farhadi declined his invite to the Academy Awards this year after President Trump announced his ban on Muslims from six countries, including Farhadi’s homeland of Iran.

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Simplifiers Interview: Jeff Jones, EVP and CMO of Target

Behind every brand delivering simpler experiences for customers is a leader who recognizes the inherent value in keeping things simple. Here I interview marketing leaders and founders of brands that have performed well in the Global Brand Simplicity Index. In this Simplifiers interview, I speak with Jeff Jones, EVP and chief marketing officer of Target.

MM: What does Target stand for, and what role does simplicity play in delivering on that promise?

JJ: The Target brand stands for great value, which is expressed through our brand promise: “expect more, pay less.” It’s the combination of those two ideas that truly differentiates us from other retailers.

Simplicity plays many roles in this. At the highest order, simplicity guides what we sell—our guests trust us to scour the world and find the best products at reasonable prices.

Simplicity also impacts our store layout design. We use the racetrack, an aisle that helps people navigate the store and different departments. And we position products strategically based on customer needs. For example, we put women’s ready-to-wear near children’s products so a mother who’s shopping for her family can easily find other products that are relevant to her. This design helps people discover new products they wouldn’t have otherwise.

MM: How do you strive to create simple experiences within Target?

JJ: We start with the belief that being simple is good, not bad. I think many people in corporations think they’re creating value by making things complicated.

There’s a book that was given to me called Obvious Adams. It’s a story about an advertising person who was unafraid to say what was obvious. It’s not easy for people to see that the simple solution is often the best. Our job as leaders is to simplify.

For example, I created a simple framework for initiatives based on three questions: What’s the problem, what’s the guest insight and what’s the idea? If a person on our team can’t answer those three things clearly, no amount of homework or research matters.

MM: What are the challenges of creating simple experiences for customers?

JJ: Being simple is an extraordinary skill—it means taking lots of ideas, possibilities, and challenges and distilling them into the essence of what matters most. This is being lost among generations of marketers whose education emphasizes technical skills like data analysis and underemphasizes the strategic art of simplifying.

Being simple is an extraordinary skill—it means taking lots of ideas, possibilities, and challenges and distilling them into the essence of what matters most.

MM: How do you strive to conquer complexity within Target?

JJ: It’s important to be a model and be unafraid to be the person that says the most obvious thing. Embrace it along with the power of clarity. My role is really to bring hope and lucidity to the team.

MM: What benefits has Target experienced from simplifying?

JJ: Part of my role is head of communications for Target, which includes team member communications. This requires communicating with hundreds of thousands of employees in a way that sticks. One of our teams came up with the concept of Target Briefly, a newsletter sent every morning to every team, that includes three things no one knows—what we’re working on as a firm, mistakes we made, etc. It has become our most successful internal communication and changed the way we connect as a company.

We’ve also gotten great benefits from the Cartwheel app, which helps people find products they want and save money. It’s personalized, has a gaming component and is easy to use. And it has helped drive more than three billion dollars in sales for Target.

MM: What’s the most recent, simple customer experience you’ve had?

JJ: I had an unbelievable order pickup experience at Apple. I was able to make the purchase on my phone, received a QR code that was stored in my Apple Wallet and get a message when my order was ready. When I arrived at the Apple store, a team member scanned my QR code. While the item was being retrieved, my payment was processed and by the time I signed the receipt digitally, an employee was there with my MacBooks offering to carry them to my car. It was the absolute benchmark for order pickup.

MM: What’s the top piece of advice you’d give to executives trying to simplify?

JJ: Shift your frame of reference from simplicity as an “aspiration” to “it’s my job.” Then it becomes the most important job you have and a strategic priority.

Put metrics in place that demonstrate whether you’re delivering simple experiences for customers and employees (e.g., workplace productivity and the Net Promoter Score). Find opportunities to celebrate and acknowledge the people who deliver wonderfully simple solutions to problems.

The bottom line is that it’s hard to simplify. You have to be willing to make sacrifices and prioritize some things over others. This is where brands make their biggest mistake: they lose sight of what matters to the people they’re serving. When you do what you think you should do, as opposed to what your buyer needs you to do, you make poor decisions.

Some people say the customer doesn’t really know what solution he needs. Don’t look to the customer for the solution, look to them for the problem to solve.

MM: Thanks Jeff.

This interview of Jeff Jones, EVP and chief marketing officer of Target, was conducted, edited and condensed by Margaret Molloy.

This is one in an ongoing Simplifiers series. See interviews with Spotify CMO, Seth Farbman; Ally CMO, Andrea Riley; McDonald’s USA CMO, Deborah Wahl; Direct Line Group Marketing Director, Mark Evans; President of Jet.com,Liza Landsman and VP of Marketing at Jet.com, Sumaiya Balbale.

Margaret Molloy is global CMO and head of business development at Siegel+Gale. Follow her on Twitter: @MargaretMolloy and Instagram: @MargaretMMolloy

The post Simplifiers Interview: Jeff Jones, EVP and CMO of Target appeared first on Siegel+Gale: Brand Consulting, Experience, Strategy, and Design.

Seven Takeaways From the Consumer Analysts Group of New York Conference


What’s top of mind for marketers and investors right now? Judging by last week’s Consumer Analysts Group of New York meeting last week in Boca Raton, Fla., it’s the specter of acquisition, the need for cost cutting — oh, and Satanism and a glue shortage. Here we present seven takeaways from the conference, in which 28 consumer packaged-goods companies laid out a road map for the year ahead to analysts.

Price cuts ahead

For those who are into signs, Edgewell Personal Care, maker of Schick and private-label blades for such retailers such as Walmart, saw its stock plunge exactly 6.66% –the supposed mark of the devil — on Feb. 23 after P&G Chief Financial Officer Jon Moeller announced at the conference that Gillette will cut razor blade prices a whopping 12% on average starting March 30. The devil is in the details, of course, and P&G provided few. A spokesman said all Gillette blades, even high-end Fusion ProShield, could see some reduction. Mr. Moeller said prices on some blades could fall as much as 20%. An Edgewell spokesman noted that P&G already had been cutting blade prices, though Nielsen data from Deutsche Bank show only by 1% for the 12 weeks ended Jan. 28. The move aims to reverse share gains by cheaper blades that include Edgewell’s private labels, Harry’s (which moved into Target last year) and Unilever’s Dollar Shave Club.

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4A’s Names MEC’s Marla Kaplowitz as New President


After an eight-month-long search, the 4A’s is poised to name MEC North America CEO Marla Kaplowitz as its new president-CEO, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

Although it was not clear Friday whether the appointment had been finalized, Ms. Kaplowitz, who has been MEC’s North American leader since October 2011, is set to succeed longtime 4A’s President-CEO Nancy Hill, the people said. Ms. Hill is expected to stay on with the association until June 2017.

Ms. Kaplowitz could not be reached for comment. Bill Koenigsberg, founder of Horizon Media and chairman of the 4A’s board of directors, declined to comment.

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4A’s Poised to Name MEC’s Marla Kaplowitz as New President


After an eight-month-long search, the 4A’s is poised to name MEC North America CEO Marla Kaplowitz as its new president-CEO, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

Although it was not clear Friday whether the appointment had been finalized, Ms. Kaplowitz, who has been MEC’s North American leader since October 2011, is set to succeed longtime 4A’s President-CEO Nancy Hill, the people said, the people said. Ms. Hill is expected to stay on with the association until June 2017.

Ms. Kaplowitz could not be reached for comment. Bill Koenigsberg, founder of Horizon Media and chairman of the 4A’s board of directors, declined to comment.

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Calling All Marketing Technology Trailblazers


Do you know someone who is doing extraordinary work in the field of marketing technology?

Ad Age is seeking the digital transformers, data scientists and stack stars that fuel the world of marketing technology. Our new Marketing Tech Trailblazers list, publishing April 17, will recognize industry movers who are creating, collecting and harnessing data to create smart marketing. And we are seeking your help for nominations for this influential list.

You may nominate someone at a technology vendor who is offering cool new products and showing the industry how to use it in new ways; the digital technologist at a marketer who is doing outstanding work applying digital tools of the trade to smartly manage and grow the company’s business; the data and insights strategist at an ad or marketing agency who is applying those learnings to business and winning.

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Post Zubi Advertising, Joe Zubi Seeks His Next Job


For the first time since Tere Zubizarreta opened U.S. Hispanic shop Zubi Advertising Services more than 40 years ago, there won’t be a Zubizarreta at Zubi.

Joe Zubi and Michelle Zubizarreta are planning their next acts after earlier this month selling the family-owned agency started by their mother to WPP’s GTB agency network in a deal that brought one of the last remaining significant pieces of Ford Motor Co. business into the holding company.

Rather than an earnout agreement that would keep them at the agency, the two siblings have a brief two-month consulting agreement through next month.

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